marginal cost

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Related to Marginal costs: Marginal revenue, Opportunity costs

marginal cost

[′mär·jən·əl ′kȯst]
(industrial engineering)
The extra cost incurred for an extra unit of output.
References in periodicals archive ?
Todays final rule advances two of the Commissions goals with regard to that effort: LMPs will be more likely to reflect the true marginal cost of production when resources short-run marginal costs exceed $1,000/MWh, and resources will have the incentive to participate in RTO and ISO electricity markets when their short-run marginal costs exceed $1,000/MWh because they have the opportunity to recover these costs.
Jeremy Rifkin, president of TIR Consulting Group and the Foundation on Economic Trends, occasionally acknowledges the productivity of capitalism in his new book, The Zero Marginal Cost Society.
Despite differences between charging systems for high-speed lines, important mark-ups above marginal costs are applied by all the systems analysed and that common features between them can be established (Sanchez-Borras & Lopez-Pita, 2011).
Giokas showed that the marginal costs of the outputs derived from the combination of DEA at the first stage and either goal-programming or regression at the second appeared to be more accurate than those based on DEA or RA alone.
The gains are substantial: marginal costs within plant-product categories drop by approximately 15-25 percent during the first three years after export entry.
Te section begins with an analytical solution to fixed marginal costs in order to introduce some important characteristics of the optimal implementation of lightweighting and efficiency technology.
In the short run, commodity prices often deviate substantially from estimated marginal costs because both production and consumption are semi-fixed (the result of previous investment decisions).
The Commission is namely proposing to limit the charges set for their reuse to marginal costs of reproduction and diffusion, except in exceptional cases justified by objective, transparent and verifiable criteria.
Our main finding is that the NKPC performs equally well with both measures of marginal costs, output and unit labor costs.
There are two reasons to believe that Canadian water prices do not reflect the marginal costs of supply.
In this literature, the Phillips curve implies that inflation can be expressed as the discounted sum of expected future marginal costs, where marginal costs equal the labor share.
Thus, strict equality between prices and their respective marginal costs is necessary for Pareto optimality in a single price (non-discriminatory) price system.