Maria Feodorovna

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Maria Feodorovna

(märē`ä fyô`dərəvnə), 1847–1928, czarina of Russia, consort of Alexander IIIAlexander III,
1845–94, czar of Russia (1881–94), son and successor of Alexander II. Factors that contributed to Alexander's reactionary policies included his father's assassination, his limited intelligence and education, his military background, and the influence
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 and mother of Nicholas IINicholas II,
1868–1918, last czar of Russia (1894–1917), son of Alexander III and Maria Feodorovna. Road to Revolution

Nicholas was educated by private tutors and the reactionary Pobyedonostzev.
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. Originally named Dagmar, she was the daughter of Christian IXChristian IX,
1818–1906, king of Denmark (1863–1906). A member of the cadet line of Sonderburg-Glücksburg, he succeeded Frederick VII, last of the direct line of Oldenburg.
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 of Denmark and the sister of Queen AlexandraAlexandra,
1844–1925, queen consort of Edward VII of Great Britain, whom she married in 1863. She was the daughter of Christian IX of Denmark.
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 of Great Britain. She devoted herself to philanthropic and educational activities, especially the Red Cross. Detained (1917) in the Crimea by the revolutionaries, she was freed by German forces and immigrated to England and then to Denmark, where she spent her last years. Her remains were moved to St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2006. Her letters to Nicholas II were published in The Secret Letters of the Last Tsar (tr. 1938).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Empress Maria Fedorovna was enchanted by the gift - a white enamel shell encasing a golden yolk which contained a shimmering hen, which in turn concealed a miniature diamond crown and ruby pendant.
Russian Czar Alexander III commissioned the first of the elaborate eggs from craftsman Peter Carl Faberge as an Easter gift for his wife Empress Maria Fedorovna.
Inspired by a meeting with a deaf boy in 1807, Dowager Empress Maria Fedorovna sought advice on Deaf education from progressive France, and she implemented their sign language-based form of teaching at the Murzinka School in Pavolvsk, the first Russian Deaf school.