Mariamne


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Mariamne

(mārēăm`nē). 1 Second of Herod the Great's 10 wives. She was a descendant of the Maccabees. Herod loved her greatly, but he had her murdered after she was falsely accused by her sister Salome. 2 Another wife of Herod. She was renowned for her beauty. Herod divorced her because she took part in a plot against him.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a period when botany was terribly important and we had a couple of very good examples in Wales like Theresa Anne Llewelleyn of Penllergaer and Mariamne Johnes of Hafod, both of whom were girls who were very serious about their botanising.
Names were carved on six of the ten ossuaries and have been read as: Jesus son of Joseph, Maria, Mariamne kai Mara, Jose, Judah son of Jesus, and Matthew.
10) However, where Brunvand may be more family friendly, Mariamne Whatley and Elissa Henken delve into the more explicit side of sexual urban legends (including variations of the famous "peanut butter" story that I heard twenty years ago in high school) to illustrate the real world consequences of this misinformation.
Siffrid, by Elizabeth Hervey, specifically contrasts the two qualities: "Lady Mariamne, laying aside her usual forbidding haughtiness, was all condescension" (71).
Herodias had been married already to Antipas' brother, Philip (27 BC-AD 34), who, being the son of Herod the Great by Mariamne daughter of Simon, likewise was her half-uncle.
A third hints that the Yeshua person was married to another occupant of the tomb, a woman named Mariamne, whom Mr.
Francois Bovon, professor of the history of religion at Harvard University, told Discovery News, "Mariamene, or Mariamne, probably was the actual name given to Mary Magdalene.
jealously killed his good wife Mariamne, then "base" as
Saint Mariamne, the sister of Apostle Filippos; Empress Helen, the Mother of Emperor Constantine; Martyress Thekla; Olga-Great Princess of Russia; Nina-Enlightener of Georgia--they worked in apostolic service: teaching and preaching Christianity.
The third chapter, "'The Parterre Becomes an Actor,' 1680-1725," is about the "critical juncture" when the parterre came to power in the French theatre (10); Ravel covers such areas as the Comedie-Francaise versus the Comedie-Italienne and spectators at fairground theatres, then culminates in a discussion of the Parterre's role in ruining the 1724 production of Voltaire's Mariamne.
In his last work Herod and Mariamne, Lagerkvist takes the theme of how isolation from God creates profound social alienation to its limits.
4) Such roles included for instance Salome in Samuel Pordage's Herod and Mariamne (1671?