Marie de l'Incarnation

Marie de l'Incarnation

(də lăNkärnäsyôN`), 1599–1672, French missionary. Her name was originally Marie Guyard. She was married in her youth and bore a son; when her son was 12 years old, her husband being dead, she entered the Ursuline order. At her entreaty, the authorities gave her and another nun permission to go to New France to work among the Native Americans. In 1639 she arrived in Quebec, where she was soon head of an Ursuline convent. She administered her house with great success and worked among the Native Americans with notable results. Her letters are valuable sources of French Canadian history. She wrote devotional works and catechisms, not only in French but in Native American languages.

Bibliography

See A. Repplier, Mère Marie of the Ursulines (1931).

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Jean de Brebeuf, a missionary in Canada from 1625 to 1649, and Catherine's celestial cathedral guide, was a practicing mystic during his life, as was the famous Ursuline nun and writer, Marie de l'Incarnation, when she arrived in Quebec in 1639.
in 1615, taking the name of Marie de l'Incarnation.
We know all this from the testimony of one sister who survived, Marie de l'Incarnation, who was not with the others in Compiegne, but in Paris, when the nuns' arrests occurred.
Les religieuses evoquees par l'auteure dans son premier chapitre sont, comme la fondatrice du monastere, Marie de l'Incarnation, des femmes volontaires, ayant une experience de vie et un remarquable sens pratique qu'elles appliquent avec determination: leurs broderies delicates sont clairement appliquees a la banniere d'une << oeuvre de civilisation >>.
29) Besides the six Voyages we know of today, there is direct or indirect documentation of Radisson's activities in the Jesuit Relations, the letters of Marie de l'Incarnation, in archival repositories in Quebec, the archives of the Hudson's Bay Company, the British Library, the Bibliotheque Nationale, the Public Record Office, the Vatican Archives, and even a possible contact account from the Native point of view.
Bruneau's study, informed by yet challenging the works of Michel de Certeau and Caroline Walker Bynum, examines two Frenchwomen: Marie de l'Incarnation and Madame Guyon.
Davis, with customary virtuosity, explores the lives of Glikl bas Judah Leib, a Jewish merchant woman; Marie Guyart, known as Marie de l'Incarnation, mystic and co-founder of the first Ursuline school for girls in North America; and Maria Sibylla Merian, an artist-naturalist and author.
28) At least two Canadians are said to have been beatified without approved miracles: Francois-Xavier de Montmorency Laval (1979) and Marie de l'Incarnation Guyart (1980).
Specifically with respect to the colonial context, collected editions of the writings of well-known female authors, such as, the Canadian mystic, Marie de l'Incarnation, the American poet, Anne Bradstreet and the Mexican mystic, Sor Juana de la Cruz, (3) have, over the years, appeared alongside collections of lesser known colonial women writers, such as the spiritual diary of Ursula de Jesus, the Afro-Peruvian mystic, (4) as well as anthologies containing scattered fragments of female writings that do remain.
This book charts the intersection of public and private in the lives of the Ashkenazi business woman and autobiographer Glikl bas Judah Leib (1646/7-1724); the Ursuline educator in New France, Mere Marie de l'Incarnation (1599-1671); and the German entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717).
Le cas de Marie de l'Incarnation, 1599-1672 >>.