Mariology

(redirected from Mariological)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Mariological: Mariologist

Mariology:

see MaryMary,
in the Bible, mother of Jesus. Christian tradition reckons her the principal saint, naming her variously the Blessed Virgin Mary, Our Lady, and Mother of God (Gr., theotokos). Her name is the Hebrew Miriam.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For better or worse, this purity has been conveniently linked with notions of biblical, Mariological virginity that are often unclear and highly debated.
Stolz's voluminous study concerns the Mariological poem Der Tum (seventy-two twelve-line stanzas) which forms book 12 in the Gottingen manuscript of Mugeln's Spruchdichtung.
As far as the internal life of the church was concerned, the greatest number of suggestions was for new Mariological declarations.
faults Tillard for consistently avoiding spousal and mariological ecclesial metaphors, and for insufficiently emphasizing the church's subjectivity in relation to Christ.
His mariological work, The Burning Bush: On the Orthodox Veneration of the Mother of God, which was translated into English in 2009, offers a middle ground between traditional Eastern and Western theologies insofar as he treats original sin as both an inherited disease that causes mortality and as a condition of mortality that causes further sin.
Listen to the Universal Doctor, Alan of Lille, for example, whose In Cantica Canticorum ad laudem Deiparae Virginis Mariae elucidatio was, like the commentary by Rupert of Deutz that inspired it, a mariological tour de force: "And so, although the song of love, Solomon's wedding song, refers particularly and according to its spiritual sense to the Church, in its most particular and spiritual reference it signifies the most glorious Virgin.
The Mariological scholar Rene Laurentin estimated that there have been well over two hundred apparitions since the 1930s.
Here Reynolds discusses the mariological theology and practice of the Greek East up to the eighth century, and Mariology of the Latin West through the 14th century.
That the Catholic and the Orthodox share various practices in relation to the Blessed Virgin Mary makes their divergence on mariological doctrine more ecumenically bearable than the Catholic-Protestant divergence, which is not bridged by shared practice.
13) The entire theme is Mariological but ingeniously typological.
This debate also appears in the mariological literature of late antiquity, which occasionally responds to the Jewish challenge to Mary's virginity.