Maritain


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Maritain

Jacques . 1882--1973, French neo-Thomist Roman Catholic philosopher
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16) But when one does not accept the distinction between antecedent and consequent wills in God, ensuing universalism is almost inevitable (17)--hence why Thomists like Jacques Maritain, Bernard Lonergan, and William Most, building on the interpretative work of Francisco Marin-Sola, use the distinction in a way that does not contradict the universal salvific will of God.
How Maritain May Have Bridged the Gap Between Metaphysics and Activism" contains Raymond Denhey's argument for Maritain's notion of the intuition of being as assisting Maritain in both his philosophical contemplation and activism.
Providing readers with a strong list of texts that could serve as general introductions to Maritain's body of works for those who are not ready to tackle Maritain on their own, D'Souza explains that the "principle aim is to provide a book of quotations as a ready reference for those who are familiar with Maritain's thought and writings" (p.
Maritain would seem to overlook proportions as proportions, which would involve some specification of measurement or fittingness, in order to account for their presence in a work of art as one akin to words or other signs: they present themselves in such a way as also to represent and reveal something beyond themselves.
construction of a school cafeteria at the school Maritain Renan Lafontaine
Unless he had discussed the term with Tate or read the work of Jacques Maritain, which seems unlikely, Stevens would have found Tate's use of angelisme unfamiliar, and in any case Stevens seems to be talking about "the attachment to real things" in his letter to Tate about his bed and his haircut.
In this sense, Maritain stands closer to Pseudo-Dionysius than to Maximus--closer to an ontology in which finite particulars are almost arbitrary signs.
Although Rhonheimer avoids Maritain's optimism regarding the application of human rights in the contemporary world (and perhaps the overly Aristotelian approach taken in Man and the State), his position seems in developed continuity with the approach taken by Maritain in Integral Humanism.
As I will argue later, this allows Maritain to develop a distinctly original notion of the creative process.
2) Neo-Thomism (Etienne Gilson, Jacques Maritain, and Karol Wojtyla (Pope John Paul II)); (ch.
Tolkien, and their circles in Britain, as well as philosophers Jacques Maritain and Etienne Gilson in France.
While cool to the notion of replicating a European revival of letters in America, his Catholic intellectual formation, like that of so many other young Catholic intellectuals during that era, had nonetheless been shaped by many of the Catholic luminaries who defined the effort--Chesterton and Belloc, Newman, Christopher Dawson, the French neo-Thomists Maritain and Gilson, Karl Adam, and others.