Akenside, Mark

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Akenside, Mark

(ā`kĭnsīd), 1721–70, English poet and physician. His chief literary work was the didactic poem The Pleasures of Imagination (1744). Among his other works are the neoclassical Odes on Various Subjects (1745) and the Epistle to Curio (1744), a vigorous political satire. Akenside's conversion to Tory principles at the accession of George III earned him the appointment of physician to the queen.
References in periodicals archive ?
En 1744 Mark Akenside, afirma que se le ha convertido el corazon en <<el sensorio universal de la pena, / el miserable heredero de males ajenos>> (6).
The literary career of Mark Akenside, including an edition of his non-medical prose.
Mee illustrates how Shaftesbury's disciplined enthusiasm structured sentimental novels by writers like Henry Mackenzie and the verse of "Shaftesburian poets" like Mark Akenside and James Thomson.
Moreover, if Dupre chooses to focus on eighteenth-century aesthetic theories, particularly those based on expressivity, the absence of John Dennis or Mark Akenside is difficult to justify.
In 1774 Mark Akenside published a poem entitled "The Pleasures of Imagination," which put forward some radical ideas about poetry and originality.
Other Gentleman's Magazine discoveries included 'Corinna', who was runner-up in the 1735 epigram competition with a poem entitled 'On a Gentleman whose Thigh was put out of joint, by a Young Lady whom he attempted to kiss, as she was playing on her Spinet', and the adolescent Mark Akenside, whose subsequent career might, indeed, be said to represent a triumph for the kind of dissenting, provincial talent fostered by Cave.
A fourth book was added later, and the whole poem was extensively revised, finally appearing posthumously in The Poems of Mark Akenside, M.
It's about the Newcastle-born 18th-century poet and physician Mark Akenside whose life, at the briefest of glances, contains many rich pickings.
Now Fairleigh Dickinson University Press has provided an elegant new edition of the works of the physician and poet Mark Akenside (1721-70).
A statue of Chaucer might fittingly have been erected in Woodstock Park, and Mark Akenside composed an inscription that could have graced it:(22)
See "The Design" of the poem in The Poetical Works of Mark Akenside ed.