Akenside, Mark

(redirected from Mark Akenside)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Akenside, Mark

(ā`kĭnsīd), 1721–70, English poet and physician. His chief literary work was the didactic poem The Pleasures of Imagination (1744). Among his other works are the neoclassical Odes on Various Subjects (1745) and the Epistle to Curio (1744), a vigorous political satire. Akenside's conversion to Tory principles at the accession of George III earned him the appointment of physician to the queen.
References in periodicals archive ?
The literary career of Mark Akenside, including an edition of his non-medical prose.
Mee illustrates how Shaftesbury's disciplined enthusiasm structured sentimental novels by writers like Henry Mackenzie and the verse of "Shaftesburian poets" like Mark Akenside and James Thomson.
In 1774 Mark Akenside published a poem entitled "The Pleasures of Imagination," which put forward some radical ideas about poetry and originality.
It's about the Newcastle-born 18th-century poet and physician Mark Akenside whose life, at the briefest of glances, contains many rich pickings.