crash

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crash

1
1. a sudden descent of an aircraft as a result of which it hits land or water
2. the sudden collapse of a business, stock exchange, etc., esp one causing further financial failure

crash

2
a coarse cotton or linen cloth used for towelling, curtains, etc.

crash

[krash]
(computer science)
A breakdown, hardware failure, or software problem that renders a computer system inoperative.
(textiles)
A coarse, rugged fabric woven from linen, cotton, or a combination of both.

crash

(1)
A sudden, usually drastic failure. Most often said of the system, especially of magnetic disk drives (the term originally described what happened when the air gap of a hard disk collapses). "Three lusers lost their files in last night's disk crash." A disk crash that involves the read/write heads dropping onto the surface of the disks and scraping off the oxide may also be referred to as a "head crash", whereas the term "system crash" usually, though not always, implies that the operating system or other software was at fault.

crash

(2)
To fail suddenly. "Has the system just crashed?" "Something crashed the OS!" See down. Also used transitively to indicate the cause of the crash (usually a person or a program, or both). "Those idiots playing SPACEWAR crashed the system."

crash

(1) An abnormal termination of a software program. See abend and crash in Windows.

(2) A hard disk failure. See head crash.
References in periodicals archive ?
The best response to market crashes has usually been to do nothing, or to grab shares of some beaten-down stocks that are now in bargain territory.
The stock market crashes from 2000 to 2008 were engineered in which top government functionaries and influential brokers were directly involved, said Abdullah Tariq, SVP, PEW in a statement issued here.
The recognition of certain engineering and geologic events as analogous in this way to financial market crashes was the impetus for the interesting and enjoyable new book Why Stock Markets Crash: Critical Events in Complex Financial Systems, by Didier Sornette.