Marmont, Auguste Frédéric Louis Viesse de

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Marmont, Auguste Frédéric Louis Viesse de

(ōgüst` frādārēk` lwē vyĕs də märmôN`), 1774–1852, marshal of France. He fought with Napoleon in Italy and Egypt and took part in his coup of 18 Brumaire (1799). In 1808 he was made duke of Ragusa and later governor of Illyria. He succeeded André Masséna as commander in the Peninsular WarPeninsular War,
1808–14, fought by France against Great Britain, Portugal, Spanish regulars, and Spanish guerrillas in the Iberian Peninsula. Origin and Occupation
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, but was defeated (1812) at Salamanca. In command of the defense of Paris in 1814, he was forced to surrender and later signed a convention with the allies that prevented Napoleon from retaking Paris. During the Restoration he supported King Charles X, and he left France when Charles was overthrown in 1830. He wrote memoirs.

Marmont, Auguste Frédéric Louis Viesse de

 

Born July 20, 1774, in Chatillon-sur-Seine, Burgundy; died Mar. 2, 1852, in Venice. Marshal of France (1809); duke of Ragusa (1808).

Marmont came from a noble family. He entered the army in 1790, graduated from the artillery school in Chalons in 1792, and took part in the siege of Toulon in 1793. From 1796 until 1798 he was an adjutant under Napoleon Bonaparte. In 1798 he became a brigadier general and took part in the coup d’etat of 18 Brumaire. In 1800 he was artillery commander of the Italian Army and a division general. Between 1806 and 1811 he served as governor-general of Dalmatia and the Illyrian provinces. In the battle of Wagram he commanded a corps, and in 1811-12 he was commander of troops in Portugal and Spain. He took part in campaigns in 1813-14 in Germany and France as a corps commander. Together with E. Mortier he signed the surrender of the Paris garrison in 1814. After denouncing Napoleon, he went over to the side of the Bourbons and remained loyal to them during the Hundred Days. In 1814 he became a French peer. He was a member of the Higher Military Council. During the July Revolution of 1830 he tried unsuccessfully to put down the uprising in Paris; after this attempt he fled abroad with Charles X.