Marmousets


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Marmousets

(märmo͞ozā`), [Fr.,=little fellows], ministers of King Charles VCharles V
(Charles the Wise), 1338–80, king of France (1364–80). Son of King John II, Charles became the first French heir apparent to bear the title of dauphin after the addition of the region of Dauphiné to the royal domain in 1349.
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 of France, so called by the great nobles, who were contemptuous of their humble origins. Olivier de ClissonClisson, Olivier de
, 1336–1407, French soldier, b. Brittany. He fought on the English side in the War of the Breton Succession but entered the French service as companion in arms to Bertrand Du Guesclin. In 1380 he became constable of France.
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 was the most prominent Marmouset. They were recalled by King Charles VICharles VI
(Charles the Mad or Charles the Well Beloved), 1368–1422, king of France (1380–1422), son and successor of King Charles V. During his minority he was under the tutelage of his uncles (particularly Philip the Bold, duke of Burgundy), whose policies drained
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 when he reached his majority, but they fell from power after he became mad (1392). Their administration attempted to restore sound and conservative government.
References in periodicals archive ?
He further placed everyone under the surveillance of his closest advisors, known by their detractors as the marmousets, giving veto power to his closest advisor, Bureau de la Riviere, 'lequel scet pleinement nostre volente et entencion sur le fait de noz enfanz dessuz diz' ('who fully knows our will and intention regarding our said children').
Importantly, this document does not refer to Louis Hotteterre, the brother of Nicolas (dit Colin), who lived on the rue Marmousets in the parish of Ste Marie Magdelaine, but to the Louis whom I first identified in an earlier article: a letter written in 1712 by the French oboist Louis Rousselet mentions that he had left a musette for repair with Louis Hotteterre, who lived 'proche le Pon [sic] Marie.
Having now documented Louis's address and instrument business near the Pont Marie Therese for the years 1691, 1692 and 1712, while the other Louis lived on the rue Marmousets and evidently worked in his brother Nicolas's atelier (according to common practice, he would have used his brother's stamp), we can conclude that the former made instruments stamped 'L/Hotteterre' with a fleur-de-lis above, whereas instruments by the latter would have been made in the workshop of Nicolas Hotteterre and stamped 'N/Hotteterre' with a six-pointed star above.