Marprelate


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Marprelate

Martin, the pen name of the anonymous author or authors of a series of satirical Puritan tracts (1588--89), attacking the bishops of the Church of England
References in periodicals archive ?
As complexly constituted as Yates's performance of Margaret of Anjou seems to be, that character appears relatively simple when compared with the character of Martin Marprelate, the subject of J.
van Eerde, "Robert Waldegrave: the printer as agent and link between sixteenth-century England and Scotland," Renaissance Quarterly 34 (1981): 4078; Martin Marprelate, Oh read over D.
This incident was referred to by Martin Marprelate in his Epistle, where addressing the Archbishop of Canterbury he says, "Did not your grace of late erecte a new printer .
Lander considers such diverse moments of religious and print interventions as the Marprelate texts, Foxe's Book of Martyrs, the first and second quartos of Hamlet, and Milton's Areopagitica.
In outline, polemic was born with "Foxe's Books of Martyrs: printing and popularizing the Actes and Monuments'" grew turbulent in its early years of "Martin Marprelate and the fugitive text," gained definition in contrast to literature in "Printing Donne: poetry [An Anatomy of the World] and polemic [Pseudo- Martyr] in the early seventeenth century," and achieved a maturity that simultaneously marked a decline in Milton's defense of the form itself in "Areopagitica and 'The True Warfaring Christian.
Theatrical companies had capitalized on the Marprelate phenomenon by developing a genre of anti-Martinist farce, in which risible characters representing the anti-prelatical "Martin" were subjected to violent abuse and even death (Talbert 1963, 54-55, 22).
C'est d'abord avec les pamphlets de Marprelate (autour de 1588) concernant la hierarchie de l'Eglise elisabethaine que le pamphlet devient un genre litteraire, regi par des conventions qui rendent accessibles des discours elitistes et theologiques aux lecteurs de la classe moyenne.
Raymond opens with the origins of the form in the popular culture of the sixteenth century, focusing especially on the Marprelate controversy of the 1580s, and closes with the full development of the form and "pamphletization" of culture in the 1680s, using the fierce polemics surrounding the Popish Plot to punctuate his contention that as the seventeenth century progressed, pamphlets--notwithstanding their diminutive size and suspect reputation--played an increasingly vital role in the generation of public opinion, political conflict, and social policy in England.
He re-examines puritan and anti-Puritan polemics, both in the bitingly satirical Martin Marprelate tracts and the reposts which they elicited in like kind, and in the attacks on the stage written by Philip Stubbes, Stephen Gosson and their ilk, which found appropriate response in those classic caricatures of `the godly' on stage, Zeal-of-the-Land Busy in Jonson's Bartholomew Fair and Angelo in Shakespeare's Measure for Measure.
11) Early on Falstaff was, and has again recently been, also connected to the so-called anti-Marprelate tracts, a series of satirical pamphlets against the aggressive and irreverent Puritan wit of the pseudonymous Martin Marprelate, including lampooning plays whose texts have not survived but which, according to the allusions to them in surviving pamphlets and tracts, were designed to satirize Puritanism as a grotesque, hypocritical carnival.