Mars Climate Orbiter


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Mars Climate Orbiter

A NASA mission launched Dec. 1998 to produce information about the surface and climate of Mars. The mission was lost in Sept. 1999.
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1) Mars Climate Orbiter Failure Board Releases Report.
It's sad to think that a simple design review meeting to discuss units of measure could have saved the Mars Climate Orbiter, hot to mention hundreds of millions of dollars.
The failed lander mission followed the loss in September of the Mars Climate Orbiter, which flew off course and was destroyed.
SPACE INDUSTRY WORKERS SHOULD HAVE COMPARED RULERS WHEN THEY WERE DESIGNING THE MARS CLIMATE ORBITER, WHICH EITHER CRASHED OR BURNED UP IN THE MARTIAN ATMOSPHERE LAST FALL.
Coupled with the loss of the Mars Climate Orbiter, questions abound as to the future of the Mars Exploration Program.
On the same day of Japan's worst-ever nuclear mishap, NASA officials announced with no small degree of humility that human error was responsible for the loss of its Mars Climate Orbiter.
The first part, called Mars Climate Orbiter (MCO), joins Global Surveyor at the red planet after a 10-month voyage.
These include Mars Observer (1992), Mars Global Surveyor (1996), Mars Pathfinder and Sojourner (1996), Mars Climate Orbiter (1998), Mars Polar Lander (1999), Mars Odyssey (2001), Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity (2003) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (2005).
The most embarrrassing loss was the Mars Climate Orbiter mission in 1999, which went awry because of a mix-up involving metric and imperial measurement units.
The Mars Climate Orbiter was due to complete its 300m-mile, seven-month journey and slip into orbit around the Red Planet.
For example, the Mariner 6 and 7 missions flew by Mars in 1969, not 1967; and a failed 1999 NASA mission was Mars Climate Orbiter, not Mars Polar Orbiter.
1999: Nasa's Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is lost as a result of navigation error due to confusion over metric and imperial measurements.

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