Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter


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Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

A NASA Mars orbiter, part of the agency's Mars Exploration Program of crewless investigative probes, which was due for launch in August 2005. It is set to provide the most thorough examination of Mars so far. Fitted with a high-resolution camera, it aims to send back close-up images of the Martian surface with unprecedented clarity. Chief among its tasks is the search for landing-sites close to sustainable sources of water, where future human missions will be able to establish themselves.
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The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project has been using CRISM and five other instruments on the spacecraft to investigate Mars since 2006.
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been circling the planet since 2006.
tures taken by Nasa's Mars Reconnaissance High resolution pictures taken by Nasa's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft show The Beagle 2 probe, the size of a large motorcycle tyre, touched down successfull y just 5km from its intended landing site in isidis Planitia.
On Friday, more than 11 years later, European Space Agency officials reported that the Beagle-2 had been finally found -- thanks to extensive detective work based on new photos taken by the high-resolution camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
NASA is the world's most successful space agency at sending rovers and probes to Mars, and past missions have included the Viking 1 and 2 in 1975 and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in 2005.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)'s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera was used to examine gullies at 356 sites on Mars, beginning in 2006.
The NASA spacecraft known as the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is currently studying the Martian surface.
Like a youngster at summer camp, Curiosity - actually, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter - even sent home a photo showing it had arrived safe and sound at its destination.
During the past five years, researchers used OMEGA and NASA's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer, or CRISM, instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to identify clay minerals at thousands of locations on Mars.
In further confirmation, a new image transmitted by a second NASA satellite, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, showed signs of severe ice damage to the lander's solar panels.
NASA's Mars missions include the Orbiter, 2001 Mars Odyssey, two robots named Spirit and Opportunity that landed on opposite sides of the red planet in 2004, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter with a powerful camera, and the Mars Science Laboratory slated for next year.
Scientists at Brown University in Rhode Island used an instrument aboard a US spacecraft, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, to hunt for traces of phyllosilicates, or clay-like minerals that preserve a record of water's interaction with rocks.