Marshall, Louis

Marshall, Louis

(1856–1929) lawyer, civic leader; born in Syracuse, N.Y. Educated in public schools and at Columbia Law School (1877), he practiced in Syracuse, N.Y., and, from 1894, in New York City, where he became a notable for his defense of minorities in civil rights cases. He also accepted many immigration and labor cases and he successfully argued many cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. A cofounder of the American Jewish Committee, he attended the Paris Peace Conference in 1919 and worked to get antidiscrimination clauses into various treaties. He helped Jewish refugees settle in Palestine in the 1920s, in hopes that the country, then a British protectorate, would become a permanent homeland for Jews.
References in periodicals archive ?
090615SCHOOL_07 KATIE LUNN Alana Marshall, Louis Phoenix-Hyndman, Finley Watson and Robynne Goodison |
Billy Macrae, Deborah Kelly, Helen Marshall, Louis Quail, Richard Ross and Sonal Kontaria address the themes of Social Portraiture through the photographic medium
The award is often given to those with a military background, but is just as likely to be given to others as diverse as Celine Dion, George Marshall, Louis Pasteur, Duke Ellington, Salvador Dali, Toni Morrison and Alexis de Tocqueville.
He cited several justices who had not been judges before appointed to the Supreme Court, including John Marshall, Louis Brandeis and Felix Frankfurter.