Sahlins, Marshall David

(redirected from Marshall Sahlins)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Sahlins, Marshall David

(1930–  ) cultural anthropologist; born in Chicago. Educated at the University of Michigan and Columbia University, he taught at Michigan and Chicago and made important contributions in oceanic ethnography, cultural evolution, and economic anthropology. His major works include Evolution and Culture (1960) and Culture and Practical Reason (1976).
References in periodicals archive ?
A recent brief contestation between Marshall Sahlins (2011,2012) and myself (Shapiro 2012) raises questions of fundamental importance to kinship theory.
This essay frames Browne's project both as a response to the current financial crisis in the eurozone and the outcome of a self-consciously anthropological approach to economics, informed by the ideas of Marshall Sahlins.
Laqueur, professor of history at the University of California at Berkeley; Sheldon Pollock, professor of Sanskrit and Indian studies at Columbia University; Marshall Sahlins, professor of anthropology and social sciences emeritus at the University of Chicago; and Robert A.
Influenced by the study of everyday life by sociologists (Thorstein Veblen, Georg Simmel, Henri Lefebvre, Pierre Bourdieu) and anthopologists (Claude Levi-Strauss, Marshall Sahlins, Mary Douglas), cultural studies begins examining how we (not they) live.
Marshall Sahlins, in his Islands of History (Sahlins 1985), vividly illustrated a case in which social stratification led to two distinct modes of time/history-reckoning, one deep and genealogical and one shallow and habitual/mundane (Sahlins 1985: 35-54).
Marshall Sahlins makes this point in his recent book Apologies to Thucydides.
Tylor to the contemporary symbolic and social anthropologies of Mary Douglas, Clifford Geertz, and Marshall Sahlins, to name but a few, demonstrating how they shed light on such theological topics as sacrifice, gift, grace, ritual, conversion, Eucharist, and sacramental transformation.
Here Lambek has another concentration of contributions by anthropology's "heavy hitters"--Bronislaw Malinowski, Claude Levi-Strauss, Marshall Sahlins, and Mary Douglas--although not the examples of their work one usually sees in such readers.
Marshall Sahlins, in his 1972 book Stone Age Economics, wrote: "There are two possible courses to affluence.
I am fascinated by the "revisionist" anthropology of those, such as Marshall Sahlins, who argue that "non-civilized" peoples represented the "original affluent societies"--something that may have profound implications for the biblical critique of civilization.
He offers critiques of theorists such as Pierre Bourdieu, Marshall Sahlins, and Jurgen Habermas and historians E.
The apparent contradictions of his facts would not have been such a theoretical obstacle to Wagnleitner, had he taken advantage of contemporary work in sociological and anthropological theory, such as the studies of Marshall Sahlins or Grant McCracken's Culture and Consumption (1990).