Marshalsea


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Related to Marshalsea: Little Dorrit, Marshalsea Court

Marshalsea

ancient London prison, long used for incarcerating debtors. [Br. Hist.: Benét, 640]
References in periodicals archive ?
Audrey, therefore, dreams of a prison before it actually occurs to her to look for Marshalsea prison and think of Little Dorrit, whom she next impersonates.
She suffers throughout all the years of the Marshalsea, becoming a "fountain of love and fidelity" to her family and to others about her, like the mentally disabled and penniless Maggy and the destitute old pensioner, Nandy (192).
For instance, she is moved by her father's desolate solitude: "even as he sat before her on his sofa, in the brilliant light of a bright Italian day, the wonderful city without and the splendours of an old palace within, she saw him at the moment in the long-familiar gloom of his Marshalsea lodging" (478).
For Charles, this occurred at age 12 when his father was arrested for debt and sentenced to the Marshalsea, an ancient for-profit prison where debtors were forced to pay for their own stay while gathering resources through day jobs, family, and friends to pay down their debt.
See also The Case of the Marshalsea (1612) 10 Co Rep 68b, 73a; 77 ER 1027, 1033 (Coke CJ).
54) Having been born in the Marshalsea debtors' gaol, in which her father has been imprisoned for two decades, Amy has spent her entire life calling the prison home.
En la toma de la Bastilla, obviamente, Dickens se comprometio, tambien, con el impulso de la sublimacion: demolido el simbolo de todas las carceles, todas las otras carceles, vulnerables, se derrumbarian, empezando por aquella en que peno, por deudas, su propio padre, Marshalsea.
25 Salisbury The central character in Charles Dickens' novel Little Dorrit, Amy Dorrit is brought up in the debtors' prison, the Marshalsea, until her family is released after inheriting a large estate.
Alan Taylor has included a good deal of social history and he skilfully links episodes and people in Dickens' life with those in Dickens' novels: his father's term in Marshalsea Prison, for example, with Little Dorrit and a former teacher, William Jones, with Mr.
Sent from Lincoln to London, the card was addressed to a Miss L Gibbs of 62 Douglas Buildings, Marshalsea Road, London, and was posted on July 15 in 1910.
Udall survived a 1528 heresy hunt at Oxford to later become headmaster of Eton in 1534, only to confess to an accusation of buggery in 1541, for which he was imprisoned in the Marshalsea for a season (Edgerton 15-67).