Mary of Guise


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Mary of Guise

(gēz), 1515–60, queen consort of James V of Scotland and regent for her daughter, Mary Queen of ScotsMary Queen of Scots
(Mary Stuart), 1542–87, only child of James V of Scotland and Mary of Guise. Through her grandmother Margaret Tudor, Mary had the strongest claim to the throne of England after the children of Henry VIII.
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. The daughter of Claude de Lorraine, duc de GuiseGuise
, influential ducal family of France. The First Duke of Guise

The family was founded as a cadet branch of the ruling house of Lorraine by Claude de Lorraine, 1st duc de Guise, 1496–1550, who received the French fiefs of his father, René II, duke
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, she was also known as Mary of Lorraine. Before her marriage (1538) to James V she had been married (1534) to Louis d'Orléans, 2d duc de Longueville, who died in 1537. When James died (1542), shortly after his daughter's birth, James HamiltonHamilton, James, 2d earl of Arran,
d. 1575, Scottish nobleman; son of James Hamilton, 1st earl of Arran. After the death (1542) of James V, he stood next in line to the throne after the infant Mary Queen of Scots.
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, 2d earl of Arran, became regent. He negotiated (1543) the betrothal of the infant Queen Mary to Prince Edward (later Edward VI) of England, but the queen mother persuaded the Scottish Parliament to repudiate the agreement. After the outbreak of war with England, Mary of Guise arranged the betrothal of her daughter to the French dauphin, and the young queen was sent to France. By 1554, with French aid, Mary of Guise had replaced the ineffectual Arran as regent, and she made no secret of her desire to bring France and Scotland together. Meanwhile, Protestantism was spreading rapidly in Scotland, and Mary, though at first conciliatory toward the reformers, began a campaign of suppression. In 1559 the Protestants, exhorted by John KnoxKnox, John,
1514?–1572, Scottish religious reformer, founder of Scottish Presbyterianism. Early Career as a Reformer

Little is recorded of his life before 1545. He probably attended St. Andrews Univ.
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, rose against the regent and declared her deposed. Mary received French aid, but the Protestants, allied with the English, proved the stronger force. The civil war was concluded shortly after Mary's death by the Treaty of Edinburgh (1560), which ended the French domination of Scotland and opened the way for the establishment of the Protestant church.
References in periodicals archive ?
Knox, a Scottish author, writes against women's rule in general, but his indictment is specifically addressed to two Catholic queens in the British Isles at that time: Mary of Guise (15151560), Regent of Scotland after the death of her husband, James V, and Mary Tudor or Mary I of England (1516-1558).
Iona - who was Historic Scotland's first artist in residence at Stirling Castle - fell in love with Mary of Guise during her year-long tenure in 2011.
Although made especially for the marriage ceremony of James V to Mary of Guise in 1540, the first time the crown was used at a monarch's inception was at the coronation of their nine-month-old daughter Mary, as Queen of Scotland in 1543.
In 1538, James V of Scotland had married Mary of Guise, a French noblewoman.
This made him unpopular with yet another queen, Mary, Queen of Scots, and her French mother and regent, Mary of Guise.
The Flower Reader by Elizabeth Loupas In June 1560, Mary of Guise, Queen Regent of Scotland, is close to death when she demands to be left alone with her foster child Rinette Leslie.
So you assume that anything in that area was a secure zone, and that Mary of Guise - her mother - wouldn't have allowed anything in there that wasn't meant to be there," he said.
Born in 1542, the daughter of Catholic James V of Scotland and his French wife, Mary of Guise, the young Mary was very soon proclaimed Queen of Scotland on the early death of her father.
Mary of Guise and Mary Stuart in Scotland, Catherine de Medici in France, Isabella of Castille, first joint ruler of a united Spain, Margaret, Duchess of Savoy and Margaret, Duchess of Parma, both of whom ruled the Spanish Netherlands in the Habsburg interest, were all vital to their respective families.
Jansen begins her study with a chapter on Knox, who considered himself one of "God's messenger[s]" in the Blast he wrote against women's rule, particularly Mary I, Mary of Guise, and Mary Stuart.
the Catholic party, led by the Queen Dowager, Mary of Guise and the
In her endeavor to locate Elizabeth's tapestries, owned before she became queen, Bell discovers six additional sets of tapestries, of six to eight large panels each, depicting the same unusual City of Ladies subject, all owned or associated with some of the sixteenth-century's greatest regents and rulers, Margaret of Austria, Anne of Brittany, Louise of Savoy, and Mary of Guise and her daughter Mary Queen of Scots.