Mary of Modena


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Mary of Modena

(mŏd`ĭnə), 1658–1718, queen consort of James IIJames II,
1633–1701, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1685–88); second son of Charles I, brother and successor of Charles II. Early Life
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 of England; daughter of Alfonso IV, duke of Modena. Her marriage (1673) to James, then duke of York, was brought about through the influence of Louis XIV of France. Mary was a devout Roman Catholic and therefore unpopular in Protestant England. When she bore a son in 1688, it was widely rumored that this Catholic heir to the throne was a changeling, and fear of a Catholic succession precipitated the Glorious RevolutionGlorious Revolution,
in English history, the events of 1688–89 that resulted in the deposition of James II and the accession of William III and Mary II to the English throne. It is also called the Bloodless Revolution.
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 that overthrew James II. Mary fled to France with her son, James Francis Edward StuartStuart or Stewart, James Francis Edward,
1688–1766, claimant to the British throne, son of James II and Mary of Modena; called the Old Pretender.
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, and worked tirelessly to advance his claims to the English throne (see JacobitesJacobites
, adherents of the exiled branch of the house of Stuart who sought to restore James II and his descendants to the English and Scottish thrones after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. They take their name from the Latin form (Jacobus) of the name James.
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).
References in periodicals archive ?
It is thought this practice began in 1688, when dozens of officials watched Mary of Modena, wife of James II, give birth to a son, to stamp out rumours that Mary was not really pregnant and that the baby was to be smuggled into the room in a bedpan.
The birth drew a huge crowd because many doubted that the King's wife Mary of Modena was really pregnant.
James II is known to have visited the well with his wife Mary of Modena during 1686 and Princess Victoria, staying in Holywell, visited the Well in 1828.
The wedding ring of Mary of Modena, the second wife of James II (1674) was crafted of gold and rubies by an Italian designer.
Her book concludes with the popular literature dealing with the "birth" of a baby boy to Queen Mary of Modena, wife of James II, a fearful event to the Protestants.
The likelihood that the bed is associated with the Duke of York's second marriage, to Mary of Modena, is strengthened by the survival in the Victoria and Albert Museum of the suit said to have been worn by the Duke at the wedding ceremony on 21 November 1673 at Dover (Fig.
Given that it was removed from Whitehall in 1694, the King's Bed may be the bed in which Mary of Modena received the court on the day of Charles II's death on 6 February 1685.
It has been suggested that the Knole bed may have been one of these Peyrard beds, and the dates tally neatly with the Duke of York's marriage in 1673 to Mary of Modena.
Mary of Modena was feted at the French court on her journey to England, and the King encouraged the match.
The records of this episode provide further evidence linking the set with Mary of Modena, as well as revealing the circumstances of its acquisition by the 6th Earl of Dorset, who, as Lord Chamberlain, played a key role in the entertainment of William III's German cousin.
48) The 'late queen' is of course a reference to Mary of Modena, who had fled the country with James II in 1688, and this strengthens the possibility that the Knole bed was indeed her marriage bed.
There seems to be nothing to record either of his marriages, first to Anne Hyde or his second wife Mary of Modena.