MASCOT

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MASCOT

Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test: a method for software design aimed at real-time embedded systems from the Royal Signals and Research Establishment, UK.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Rugby World Cup, which takes place in Japan next year, has already unveiled a pair of pot-bellied lions as its mascots.
After months of community discussions, the board unanimously voted to approve a new mascot - the Mustangs - but the new mascot design seems to keep some Native American elements.
It was their mascot Peter Burrow - I think we can see what they did there.
Football mascots Bartley the Bluebird and Cyril the Swan make a friendly bet in Pontypridd back in 2002
And on social media it was branded "the most terrifying mascot ever", "the scariest thing you will ever see" and "Lisa Simpson on crystal meth".
In Houston, community members complained that four school mascots were outdated and derogatory: the Lamar High School Redskins, the Welch Middle School Warriors (which are linked to Indian stereotypes), the Hamilton Middle School Indians and the Westbury High School Rebels (seen as a reference to the Confederacy during the Civil War).
Previously only associated with sports teams, mascots can be a great additional element to beef up attention as well as add personality and engagement around a brand.
Staurowsky, professor of sport management at Drexel University in Philadelphia, who has researched mascots over the last two decades.
2 In the United States, mascots have traditionally been chosen to reflect qualities (such as the fighting spirit personified by predatory animals or warriors) or local or regional traits.
Welcome to the world's only mascot training school, in Tokyo Japan, where students travel from all over Japan to learn how to be cute and cuddly, all the time.
The competition will be stiff, but Notts County mascot, Mr Magpie, is the hot favourite having won the race last year.
When the University of Massachusetts at Amherst was designing their new mascot, they asked a group to develop mascots that were not gender biased and did not carry weapons (Limbaugh, 2003).