mastectomy

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Related to Masectomy: radical mastectomy

mastectomy

(măstĕk`təmē), surgical removal of breast tissue, usually done as treatment for breast cancercancer,
in medicine, common term for neoplasms, or tumors, that are malignant. Like benign tumors, malignant tumors do not respond to body mechanisms that limit cell growth.
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. There are many types of mastectomy. In general, the farther the cancer has spread, the more tissue is taken. The radical mastectomies of the past (which removed not only the breast, but underlying chest muscle and lymph nodes) have largely been replaced by less drastic, but equally effective procedures. For small tumors, lumpectomy, removing just the tumor and a margin of tissue, may be performed. A partial, or segmental, mastectomy removes the cancer, some breast tissue, the lining over the chest, and usually some lymph nodes from under the arm; total or simple mastectomy removes the whole breast; modified radical mastectomy takes the breast, lining over the chest muscles, and lymph nodes.

Breast reconstruction can be done using the patient's own tissue or breast implantsbreast implant,
saline- or silicone-filled prosthesis used after mastectomy as a part of the breast reconstruction process or used cosmetically to augment small breasts.
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. Mammograms and self-conducted breast exams have done much to reduce the need for radical procedures because they have increased early detection of the cancer, allowing it to be treated before it has spread.

mastectomy

[ma′stek·tə·mē]
(medicine)
Surgical removal of the breast. Also known as mammectomy.

mastectomy

the surgical removal of a breast
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm not looking forward to the masectomy because I've never been into hospital before so the operation will be a shock.
o 1867 Joseph Lister performed a masectomy on his sister Isabella using carbolic acid as an antiseptic.
Women who have large DCIS tumors may still need a masectomy.
A first tumour was removed, but four years later in 1995 she needed a masectomy.
In her interview, SHARON - who is also said to have had partial reconstruction surgery - refuses to feel sorry for herself over her double masectomy.
The mother of four, who has been given the all-clear from cancer, spoke candidly on Saturday Night With Miriam about her treatment, masectomy and upcoming breast reconstruction.