maternal deprivation


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maternal deprivation

lack of contact between mother figure and child. The term was coined by BOWLBY (1958) who maintained that maternal deprivation in early life would lead to behavioural problems and delinquency in later childhood and adolescence. This link has subsequently been questioned, particularly by Rutter (Maternal Deprivation Reassessed, 1981), who argued that privation, rather than maternal deprivation, was the more likely cause of the problems shown by the children Bowlby studied.
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Long-term consequences of early maternal deprivation in serotonergic activity and HPA function in adult rat.
While Raz emphasizes the importance of sensory and maternal deprivation theories, she is particularly concerned with cultural deprivation theory.
In Anna Freud's view, maternal deprivation was a far more serious trauma than bombing: "The war acquires comparatively little significance for children so long as it only threatens their lives.
Betty painted "thin, nervous old women" who symbolized maternal deprivation (p.
Early maternal deprivation reduces the expression of BDNF and NMDA receptor subunits in rat hippocampus.
By definition, adopted children have lost their biological mother through death, abandonment or separation, thus experiencing maternal deprivation, defined here as resulting from a wide range of possibilities, including maternal privation, being deprived of maternal care from birth or separated from the biological mother after some period of maternal care (Ainsworth, 1962; Gandelman, 1992).
The little boy who grows up with deep maternal deprivation may be forgiven for developing internalised anger against female figures, since mother seems to have resources to meet his needs, but has failed to be present for him emotionally.

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