Mathnawi

Mathnawi

 

a verse form in Arabic, Persian, and Turkic poetry; a rhymed hayt (distich), or a work consisting of many such distichs, each with its own rhyme, Inasmuch as the form was used chiefly in the composition of long narrative poems, the term mathnawi was applied to the genre itself. In regard to content, the most notable types within the genre are the heroic mathnawi (Shah Nama of Firdausi), the didactic-philosophical (the long poems of Nizami), and the romantic mathnawi (Layla and Majnun of Navai).

REFERENCES

Bertel’s, E. E. Istoriia persidsko-tadzhikskoi literatury. Moscow, 1960.
K viatkovskii, A. Poeticheskii slovar’ Moscow, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
The chief guest recited several verses from Rumi's works, most notably The Mathnawi, and emphasized on the example set by Jalaluddin Rumi in living a virtuous life that benefits both this world and the next.
honorable Mathnawi, exquisite description Foruzanfar, Tehran, pilgrims, Third Edition.
Rumi's works are written in the New Persian language and his Mathnawi remains one of the purest literary glories of Persia, and one of the crowning glories of the Persian language.
The latter part of her article, a catalog of "Rhetorical Devices That Lend Themselves to Multilingual Compositions," is illuminating indeed and started me thinking about igtibas in Arabic and the ways it operates in poetry, and wishing I could plumb the Mathnawi myself.
Sahebhonar, "Lost in Translation: An Intertextual Study of Personal Proper-name (PPN) Allusions in English Renderings of Rumi's Mathnawi," Across Languages and Cultures (2008) and, with H.
delightfully didactic and allegorical mathnawi (lit.
Afghanistan and its surrounding region that produced such sufi masters and poets as Ansari and Jami of Herat, Sanayi of Ghazni and Rumi of Balkh - whose Mathnawi is considered by many to be the greatest poem ever written in Persian - had its soul torn out by the Taliban who placed in its stead a jagged stone, small and dangerous and utterly lifeless.
Rumi's mystical design; reading the Mathnawi, book one.
From the sublime to the ridiculous, Rumi has been viewed and used in many ways: His six-volume masterpiece, The Mathnawi, has been called the "Qur'an in Persian.
The notion has been of conscious recurrence and pivotal significance in his twin works: Mathnawi and Divan of Shams.
49) Badi'uzzaman Furuzanfar, Ahadith-i Mathnawi (Tehran: University, 1334sh/1955), no.