Johann Mattheson

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Mattheson, Johann

 

Born Sept. 28, 1681, in Hamburg; died there Apr. 17, 1764. German writer on musical theory, composer, singer, and conductor.

Mattheson wrote several operas, 24 oratorios and cantatas, and instrumental pieces. His works on music theory were of fundamental importance. Mattheson was an advocate of national music and an adherent of the doctrine of affections in musical aesthetics, which was progressive for the times. Among his studies were The Newly Opened Orchestra (parts 1-3, 1713-21), Musical Criticism (vols. 1-2, 1722-25), and The Modern Bandmaster (1739). He was the author of the first biography of G. F. Handel.

REFERENCES

Materialy i dokumenty po istorii muzyki, vol. 2. Edited by M. V. IvanovBoretskii. Moscow, 1934.
Wolff, H. C. Die Barockoper in Hamburg (1678-1738), vols. 1-2. Wolfenbüttel, 1957.
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Indeed, Kimbell uses the lovely Mattheson quotation that "borrowing is permissible; but one must return the thing borrowed with interest".
Foretastes of heaven in Lutheran church music tradition: Johann Mattheson and Christoph Raupach on music in time and eternity.
R Mattheson, Rotherham, South Yorkshire #Don't the authorities realise that by picking up refugees mid-Channel they are just supplying a ferry service?
Intermediate girls: Isobel Chaudhry (RGS); Elisha Tait (Churchill); Alannah Browne (RGS); Rhian Purves (Kenton); Isobel Robinson (Whitley Bay); Ellen Ricketts (Queen Elizabeth HS); Holly Mattheson (Heaton Manor); Ailish Gregory (Heaton Manor).
He discusses the evidence that Beethoven understood and used key characteristics, including his personal views and his familiarity of the views of others, including Johann Mattheson, Johann Philipp Kirnberger, Johann George Sulzer, Christian Friedrich Daniel Schubart, Anton Reicha, and Carl Czerny; keys commonly and less frequently used by Beethoven and their affective characteristics, with lists of examples by Beethoven and other composers; the tonal symbolism in his solo songs, as well as modulations in them; and case studies of his concert aria oAh
Mattheson, meanwhile, sings the title song, which is also the most popular in musical.
With the score locked at 4-4 and Queen looking threatening (even when down to 10 men), Darius Mattheson was cautioned for simulation with seven minutes remaining, much to the disbelief of the Queen contingent, when it appeared that he was hacked down in the box.
About 4:40--in the middle of a three-way debate about the respective merits of redworms from Norman's Mattheson township and Town o' Mainers--it came.
In that book, Mattheson praises the human voice as "undoubtedly the most beautiful instrument [das schonste Instrument]," even while he acknowledges that it is in fact not really an instrument at all.
For Charpentier (in 1691) it was "joyful, militant;" for Mattheson (1713-19) it was "noisy, joyful;" for Rameau (1722) it was "for mirth and rejoicing.
Circles, maps, and spirals modeling root progressions and key shifts are associated with such names as Johan Mattheson, David Kellner, Gottfried Weber, and Leonhard Euler, and played a large part in the great explosion of music theory in the eighteenth century.
Mattheson, Samuel Rounds Mayo, Joseph Martin Mazzulo III, Robert George McNally Jr.