halo effect

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halo effect

[′hā·lō i‚fekt]
(industrial engineering)
A tendency when rating a person in regard to a specific trait to be influenced by a general impression or by another trait of the person.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Merton, "The Matthew Effect in Science," Science, 159 (3810), 1968, pp.
Theoretical application of the Matthew Effect and aspects of Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed serve as the lens from which to view the data.
The Matthew effect in learning performance has been proven by many studies, but it is more important to study the factors that contributed to changes in the development of student learning achievements over time.
Are there any Matthew effects in literacy and cognitive development?
Originating within the field of sociology, the Matthew effect describes a situation wherein an individual possesses an excessive amount of resources and then leverages those resources to obtain even more (Merton, 1973).
Stanovich (1986) put forth the Matthew effect theory as an etiological account of children's identification as having learning disabilities.
Onwuegbuzie, Collins, and Elbedour (2003) found what they identified as a Matthew effect.
While this trend, known as the Matthew Effect (Stanovich, 1986), seems to occur with any type of joint book reading experience, exceptions can be found in the extant literature.
Essentially, the idea behind the Matthew Effect is that initial advantage begets future advantage (i.
This is the round that could trigger the Matthew effect, so called for the passage in the gospel of Matthew: "For to him who has will more be given, and he will have abundance; but from him who has not, even what he has will be taken away.
This clearly is a form of the Matthew effect (Merton, 1968): Already famous persons (or journals) receive more credit than they actually deserve, while recognition of less prestigious scientists (or journals) is withheld.
Merton, The Matthew Effect in Science, 159 SCIENCE 56, 58 (1968)); see also Matthew 13:12 ("For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.