Maud


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Related to Maud: Maud Gonne

Maud:

see MatildaMatilda
or Maud,
1102–67, queen of England, daughter of Henry I of England. Henry arranged a marriage for her with Holy Roman Emperor Henry V, and she was sent to Germany, betrothed, and five years later (1114) married to him.
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, queen of England.

Maud

 

a motorized sailing ship used on R. Amundsen’s polar expedition.

The Maud was built in Norway in 1917. It was 29.8 m long, 10.6 m wide, and had a displacement of approximately 800 tons. In 1918–20, Amundsen sailed on the Maud through the northern sea route (northeast passage), making two winter stopovers. In 1922–24, the Maud drifted from Wrangel Island to the Novosibirsk Islands. A bay along the northeastern shore of the Taimyr Peninsula was named Mod after the Maud.

References in classic literature ?
Lovely it was,' went on Maud, dully conscious of failure, but stippling in like an artist the little touches which give atmosphere and verisimilitude to a story.
And behaved altogether in such a thoroughly gentlemanly fashion that Maud stayed awake half the night, crying.
If Maud had waited another twenty-four hours there would have been no need for her to have taxed her powers of invention, for on the following day there entered the shop and her life a young man who was not imaginary--a Lothario of flesh and blood.
He breezed into the shop, took a seat, and, having cast an experienced eye at Maud, and found her pleasing, extended both hands, and observed,
At any other time Maud might have resented being addressed as 'kid' by a customer, but now she welcomed it.
And, taking up his cane, straw hat, and yellow gloves, Mr Shute departed, leaving Maud to her thoughts.
The possibility of meeting Mr Shute had not occurred to Maud.
So smoothly was it done that it was not until she emerged from the Witching Waves, guided by the pugilist's slim but formidable right arm, that Maud realized that Arthur had gone.
But he did enough to induce Arthur Welsh, who, having sighted the missing ones from afar, had been approaching them at a walking pace, to substitute a run for the walk, and arrive just as Maud wrenched herself free.
Undeterred, brave Maud, right, said: "I'm feeling OK.
She encourages Maud to join the suffragette movement and speak up against this injustice at a parliamentary panel hosted by David Lloyd George (Adrian Schiller).
Maud becomes heavily involved in the uprising and risks her relationship with Sonny and young son George (Adam Michael Dodd).