Maunder minimum


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Maunder minimum

(mawn -der) See sunspot cycle.

maunder minimum

[′mȯn·dər ′min·ə·məm]
(astronomy)
A period of time from about 1650 to 1710 when the sun did not appear to have sunspots.
References in periodicals archive ?
Green added that there is a very strong hint that the Sun is acting in the same way now as it did in the run-up to the Maunder Minimum, when freezing winters swept across Europe.
Some even predict the sun may be entering a period of essentially no sunspot activity similar to the Maunder minimum of the 17th century.
The Maunder minimum was the period between of extremely low solar activity that occurred from 1645 to 1715.
It is interesting that the lowest temperature is associated with the Maunder Minimum while the highest is found in the late 1900s temperatures.
Baliunas: The Maunder Minimum is this episode in the 17th century where the 11-year cycle was suppressed - was very quiet - and the sun dropped to very low levels of magnetism.
The data used recorded the Maunder Minimum, a period in the late 17th century which was characterised by harsh winters and low solar activity.
Cycle 23/24 solar minimum has been the longest for a century leading some to wonder if we were heading for another prolonged period of low solar activity reminiscent of the Maunder Minimum from 1645 to 1715.
The best-known example is the Maunder Minimum (1645-1715), a solar event that is coinciding with one of the coldest phases of the Little ice Age.
15 The Maunder Minimum, which happened at the same time as the "Little Ice Age" around 1700, was a minimum in what astronomical phenomenon?
Eddy presented convincing evidence that the 11-year sunspot cycle did indeed die out between 1645 and 1715 -- a time he called the Maunder minimum after a 19th-century astronomer who first drew attention to the strange period.
For example, the last time a dearth of sun spots happened - during what is known as the Maunder minimum (1645-1715) - the northern hemisphere experienced what has become known as the Little Ice Age.
k percent faster during periods when few sunspots appear, such as the 70-year Maunder minimum.