Mausolus


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Mausolus

(môsō`ləs), d. 353 B.C., Persian satrap, ruler over CariaCaria
, ancient region of SW Asia Minor, S of the Maeander River, which separated it from Lydia. The territory is in present SW Asian Turkey. The Carians were probably a native people, but their region was settled by both Dorian and Ionian colonists.
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 (c.376–353 B.C.). He was always more or less independent. One of the satraps who revolted against Artaxerxes IIArtaxerxes II,
d. 358 B.C., king of ancient Persia (404–358 B.C.), son and successor of Darius II. He is sometimes called in Greek Artaxerxes Mnemon [the thoughtful]. Early in his reign Cyrus the Younger attempted to assassinate him and seize the throne.
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, he later allied himself with the Persian kings. He extended his power greatly, even to hegemony over Rhodes. After his death his wife, Artemisia, erected at Halicarnassus a tomb that he had planned, called the mausoleummausoleum
, a sepulchral structure or tomb, especially one of some size and architectural pretension, so called from the sepulcher of that name at Halicarnassus, Asia Minor, erected (c.352 B.C.) in memory of Mausolus of Caria.
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Mausolus

 

a Hellenistic ruler in Asia Minor from 377/76 to 353/52 B.C. He was called a Persian satrap, but in reality he was independent of Persian rule.

Mausolus’ territory consisted of the district of Caria, part of the territory of Lycia, the city of Heraclea in Latmos, the city of lasos, and part of Lydia. His rule in fact included the islands of Rhodes, Cos, and Chios, with whom Mausolus concluded a treaty of alliance. In the 460’s B.C., Mausolus moved the capital of his state to Halicarnassus, where he built many palaces and temples. The great Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (the tomb of Mausolus), erected after his death on the instructions of his wife, Aŕtemisia, was considered in antiquity to be one of the seven wonders of the world.

REFERENCE

Buscher, E. Mausollus und Alexander. Berlin, 1950.
References in classic literature ?
The queen Artemisia buried her husband Mausolus in a tomb which was reckoned one of the seven wonders of the world; but none of these tombs, or of the many others of the heathens, were ornamented with winding-sheets or any of those other offerings and tokens that show that they who are buried there are saints.
A Carian of Halicarnassus and brother of Artemisia, wife of Mausolus, who distinguished herself in war.
99) is here confused with the later Artemisia, the wife of Mausolus, who died 350 B.
The 15th-century fortress was built by the Knights of Rhodes, using building materials from the huge Tomb of King Mausolus - one of the seven wonders of the ancie nt world.
Two major attractions I stumbled across include the 13,000-seat amphitheatre and the Mausoleum, which once held the body of the ancient city's greatest ruler, Mausolus.
The story is, however, based on historical accounts of the widow queen of King Mausolus as told by several authors from the first to the sixteenth centuries, among them Pliny the Elder (A.
by chasing each other around its summit--a stepped pyramid, an imaginary reminiscence of the Tomb of Mausolus, at Halicarnassus, on top of which a statue of George I was plonked.
The Turquoise Coast, or Turkish Riviera, is home to two of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World - the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus and the Mausoleum of Mausolus at Halicarnassus.
Another must-see is the Myndus Gate, built by Mausolus in 364BC and recently restored.
The resulting chase eventually wears down the fleeing criminal, who in exhausted desperation, chances to elude his pursuers by crossing the Mausolus.
Judith Sargent Murray noted that widows could achieve immortality by memorializing husbands: "Artemisia, wife of Mausolus, rendered herself illustrious and obtained immortality by her devotion to the memory of her husband.
Yet Mausolus was a Persian satrap whose chosen form of commemoration (a pyramidal tomb) and whose lifestyle (including marriage with his sister) were distinctly un-Greek.