Maxentius


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Maxentius

(Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius) (măksĕn`shəs), d. 312, Roman emperor (306–12), son of MaximianMaximian
(Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus) , d. 310, Roman emperor, with Diocletian (286–305). An able commander, he was made caesar (subemperor) by Diocletian in 285 and augustus in 286.
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. After Diocletian and Maximian had retired, the successor to Maximian, Constantius, died. The Romans, discontented with the shift of power away from Rome, supported Maxentius, who claimed the throne. His father came out of retirement to help him when SeverusSeverus
(Flavius Valerius Severus), d. 307, Roman emperor (306–7). He participated with Galerius in an unsuccessful attempt to overthrow Maxentius. Surrendering to Maximian (father of Maxentius) at Ravenna on the condition that his life be spared, Severus was taken to Rome.
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 (d. 307) and GaleriusGalerius
(Caius Galerius Valerius Maximinianus) , d. 310, Roman emperor (305–10). Diocletian appointed him caesar for the eastern part of the empire in 293 (Constantius I was caesar of the West). He had to conduct hard campaigns in Pannonia and Asia.
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 came to force him to submission. Severus was compelled to surrender, and Galerius had to withdraw from Italy, while a fourth seeker for power, Constantine (Constantine IConstantine I
or Constantine the Great
, 288?–337, Roman emperor, b. Naissus (present-day Niš, Serbia). He was the son of Constantius I and Helena and was named in full Flavius Valerius Constantinus.
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) was persuaded to recognize Maxentius. Maxentius and his father fell out, however, and Constantine turned against Maxentius, whom he defeated (312) in the battle of Milvian Bridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
War is on the horizon for the Roman Empire, and only Maxentius, tyrant of Rome, stands between the emperor Constantine and supreme power in the west.
In the year 312, Constantine declared that his victory over Maxentius had been due to the Christian God.
It was the emperor Constantine's propaganda machine that set in motion the process of transforming the pro-Christian Maxentius into a fearsome and bloodthirsty persecutor, a tyrant in every possible sense of the word.
All the same, that night was lovely, the car sped through the deserted streets and all at once slowed to a crawl on the Aventino, Via dei Fori Imperiali, along those walls of sunbaked bricks laid bare, bathed by the golden glow of discreet spotlights, so respectful; then we got out in the thin autumn air and sat at the foot of the Basilica of Maxentius in silence, not moving, until it got late.
His aim was to reorganise his territories and mobilise the resources that, in the long run, would enable him to beat his rivals (first Maxentius and, later on, Licinius) (39).
What intrigued me was the role of her husband in securing to the young archi-star of the Italian modernist movement, Giuseppe Terragni, the commission for a project at the same time strikingly avant-garde and blatantly propagandistic--a temple to Dante, the Danteum, to be built right in the middle of the newly restructured Forums, in Rome, half way between Mussolini's headquarters and the Colosseum, in front of the Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine.
Catherine's resolution to preach against paganism at the palace of Emperor Maxentius, even though she was called and driven to do so by no church authority ("non vocata, non compulsa venit ad palatium propter defensione fidei christianae").
Saint Catherine's martyrdom parallels Hypatia's; she is said to have been a brilliant Christian philosopher condemned to death by the last pagan emperor, Maxentius, who didn't appreciate her attempt to convert him.
Framed by representations of past popes and allegorical female figures, the composition shows Constantine receiving his divine vision before the decisive battle against his rival Maxentius.
56) Inscribed with ornate flourishes 'Templum Pace' and copious measurements, evidently emanating from a survey done in situ, the plan in this tracing is that of the famous and much admired Basilica of Maxentius (308-12 AD), which almost into the 19th century was mistakenly identified as the Temple of Peace built by Vespasian; the drawing by Jan Goeree (1670-1731), here illustrated, depicts the Basilica of Maxentius but entitles this monument Templum Pacis (Fig.