Litvinov, Maxim Maximovich

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Litvinov, Maxim Maximovich

(məksyēm` mäksē`məvĭch lyĭtvē`nəf), 1876–1951, Russian revolutionary and Soviet diplomat. A Jew, he changed his name from Wallach after joining the Social Democratic party. He became a member of the Bolshevik wing after the party split (1903). He took part in the Revolution of 1905 and subsequently spent years in exile in Great Britain and Switzerland. Imprisoned in England after the Bolshevik Revolution, he was released in exchange for the British consul general, Bruce Lockhart, who had been arrested in Moscow. As chief assistant to the commissar for foreign affairs, ChicherinChicherin, Georgi Vasilyevich
, 1872–1936, Russian diplomat. Of noble origin, he entered the Russian foreign office but resigned (1904) after joining the Social Democratic party.
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, he assumed much of his superior's work, and in 1930 he succeeded Chicherin. He pursued a policy of collective security and cooperation with the great powers. In 1933 he obtained American recognition of the USSR, and in 1934, Russia entered the League of NationsLeague of Nations,
former international organization, established by the peace treaties that ended World War I. Like its successor, the United Nations, its purpose was the promotion of international peace and security.
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, where Litvinov continued to promote a peace policy and called for joint action against the aggression of Germany, Italy, and Japan. His policy was abandoned by Stalin after the Munich Pact of 1938, when Great Britain and France capitulated to German demands in Czechoslovakia, and in May, 1939, he was replaced by MolotovMolotov, Vyacheslav Mikhailovich
, 1890–1986, Soviet political leader. A Communist from 1906, he changed his name from Skriabin to Molotov [the hammer] to escape the imperial police. He was, however, arrested and exiled in 1909. He returned (1911) to St.
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 as foreign commissar. In 1941, Litvinov was named ambassador to the United States, where he served until 1943.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roosevelt negotiated personally with Soviet Foreign Minister Maxim Litvinov to open diplomatic relations between the two countries.
Bertie's life was spared in a "secret agents" exchange for the Russian diplomat, Maxim Litvinov.
Meanwhile, Soviet foreign minister Maxim Litvinov forever banned Jones from the USSR.
Carley's sympathies clearly lie with Soviet diplomats, including Ivan Maisky and Maxim Litvinov, who sought collective security in partnership with the West, and Western critics of appeasement who fought a vain battle against the dominant political culture.