Maximilian II


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Related to Maximilian II: Philip II, Ferdinand II, Rudolf II

Maximilian II,

1527–76, Holy Roman emperor (1564–76), king of Bohemia (1562–76) and of Hungary (1563–76), son and successor of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I. Before acceding he evidenced a sympathy for Lutheranism that caused grave concern in imperial and papal circles and led Holy Roman Emperor Charles V to urge that his son King Philip II of Spain succeed Ferdinand. However, Maximilian yielded and in 1562 swore to remain a Catholic and to allow his immediate heirs to be educated in Spain. He thereupon was elected king of the Romans, or Holy Roman emperor-elect (1562), and king of Hungary (1563). On Ferdinand's death (1564) he took full direction of imperial affairs. He obtained funds from the diet for the defense of Austria against the Turks but did not press his advantage, and by the truce of 1568 with Selim II he agreed to continue paying tribute to the sultan for his part of Hungary. Maximilian granted a large degree of religious toleration in his Bohemian and Austrian possessions. His policy of neutrality, however, also allowed the Counter Reformation to make considerable gains in some parts of the empire. A candidate for the throne of Poland to succeed Henry of Anjou (Henry IIIHenry III,
1551–89, king of France (1574–89); son of King Henry II and Catherine de' Medici. He succeeded his brother, Charles IX. As a leader of the royal army in the Wars of Religion (see Religion, Wars of) against the French Protestants, or Huguenots, Henry, then
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 of France), he was elected (1575) by the Polish diet as rival king to Stephen BáthoryStephen Báthory
, Pol. Stefan Batory, 1533–86, king of Poland (1575–86), prince of Transylvania (1571–75), son of Stephen Báthory (1477–1534). He was elected to succeed John II as prince of Transylvania.
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. Maximilian died, refusing the sacraments, while preparing to invade Poland. His son succeeded him as Rudolf II.

Maximilian II,

1811–64, king of Bavaria (1848–64), son and successor of Louis ILouis I,
1786–1868, king of Bavaria (1825–48), son and successor of King Maximilian I. He was chiefly responsible for transforming Munich into one of the handsomest capitals of Europe and for making it a center of the arts.
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. He had liberal tendencies and was a patron of art and learning. He hoped to create a union of small German states under Bavarian leadership as a counterweight to Austrian and Prussian influence in German affairs, but he was unable to do so. His son, Louis II, succeeded him.
References in periodicals archive ?
It establishes patronage contexts for Giuseppe Volpini--the court of Maximilian II in Bavaria and Margrave Wilhelm Friedrich in Franconia--in addition to describing sculptors' workshop structures and Giuseppe's Franconian sculpture.
His funeral oration for Maximilian II emphasized the qualities of toleration and conciliation: "Guided by such a mild and temperate spirit, Maximilian concluded that the forceful imposition of religious uniformity was morally unjustifiable" (136).
During the 1550s, when this armor was made, Maximilian II was involved in protecting Austria against the Turks.
Arcimboldo was court painter to three Hapsburg Emperors: Ferdinand I, Maximilian II and his son, Rudolph II.
She has now written a sequel in the form of a biography of Ferdinand's son and successor, Maximilian II, who ruled as emperor from 1564 to 1576.
Almost twenty years after the appearance of her biography of the Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I, Paula Sutter Fichtner has completed a study of his son and successor, the little-known Maximilian II (born 1527, Emperor from 1564-76).
Her three protagonists are the Empress Maria of Austria (1528-1603), daughter of Charles V, wife of the Emperor Maximilian II of Austria, and Philip III's aunt; Margaret of the Cross, her daughter; and Margaret of Austria (1584-1611) from the Styrian branch of the Habsburg family who married Philip III at age fifteen and died at age twenty-six after having borne him eight children, including the future Philip IV.
Our earliest source of "Helas faut-il" was published in 1580, years after Elizabeth returned to the imperial court of her father, Maximilian II.
Louthan investigates the quest for religious peace at the court of Maximilian II.
From 1581, Philip's aunt, the Empress Mar[acute{i}]a, widow of Emperor Maximilian II, lived in Madrid at the convent of the Descalzas Reales.
Conti hesitated whether to dedicate the 1567 edition of his work to Emperor Maximilian II or to the French king Charles IX, finally deciding on the latter.
Throughout his colorful career, Dudith's corresponding partners were famous scholars and thinkers, dignitaries of the Church, and some of the most powerful rulers of Europe, such as Ferdinand I and Maximilian II of Austria, and Sigismund II Augustus of Poland.