Maya architecture


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Maya architecture

The architecture of the Mayan people in Central America and Mexico from the 4th to the 15th cent., principally of pyramid temples with steep stairways.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treister's book is essentially a survey of Maya architecture from the perspective of someone outside the sphere of Maya scholarship.
The other puzzlement is that Treister, an architect, does not seem to differentiate between the architectural term 'wall' with its two exterior faces and the platform 'face' which, with its single exposed surface, is an integral part of Maya architecture (Loten & Pendergast 1984).
The site contains massive temple complexes, some of the largest Maya architecture ever constructed.
Bring home a view of Maya architecture with this intricate print of the Palacio de Palenque.
As might be expected, the topics addressed are diverse, with the 71 contributions examining such subjects as the properties of nearby galaxy structures, the conceptual and cultural history of gravitational lensing, sociology of modern technology, African cosmology, medieval books on locating the Qiblah (the Islamic direction of prayer) astronomically, the astronomy of Maimonides and its Arabic sources, the iconography of the Milky Way, astronomical objects in Brazilian rock art, astronomical and cosmological aspects of Maya architecture and urbanism, first solar and stellar paintings in the Neolithic and Epipaleolithic rock art of Iberia, solar orientations of Bronze Age shrines in Crete, and human cognition in the light of astronomical categories.
Maya Live is another example of how the Maya architecture allows for rapid innovations in effects and animation technology.
Continuity and disjunction: the Pre-Classic antecedents of Classic Maya architecture, in S.
The NT implementation is greatly facilitated by the unique modular design of the Maya architecture.
Hansen reviews what is known of the preclassic antecedents of Classic Maya architecture.
In all likelihood, Classic Maya architecture of the elite cannot be understand solely in terms of mortuary or residential architecture - the prevailing mode of interpretation - but as places where these images were housed in the splendour and cosseted privacy due them (Houston in press).
For over 100 years, Classic Maya architecture has been a central focus of archaeological investigation, yet it has only been of late that the social, political and economic contexts of architecture have been analytically considered (summarized in Abrams 1994).
The October 1994 conference on Maya architecture held at Dumbarton Oaks, and skilfully chaired by Stephen Houston (a student of Coe's) is an excellent recent example of the best kind of collaboration and, I hope, an accurate indicator of future trends.