Mayor of Casterbridge, The

Mayor of Casterbridge, The

Henchard dies in care of man he tyrannized. [Br. Lit.: The Mayor of Casterbridge, Magill I, 571–573]
See: Irony
References in periodicals archive ?
His other novels include The Mayor of Casterbridge, The Woodlanders and Jude the Obscure.
Although Wickens suggests strategies in common in The Dynasts and The Mayor of Casterbridge, the later text remains stubbornly disconnected from the rest of the novels and appears to retain only a tangential relationship to the poetry.
This can be seen most clearly in The Mayor of Casterbridge, the novel in which Hardy makes the most substantial formal parallel between his historical and philological curiosity, and in which he perfects a narrative style which itself seeks connections and explanations across time.
MY favourite Thomas Hardy novel is The Mayor of Casterbridge, the enthralling story of a man's rise and eventual destruction through fate and fatal flaws in his character.
From 1878 to 1895 Hardy published Return of the Native, The (1878), The Trumpet-Major (1880), Mayor of Casterbridge, The (1886), Woodlanders, The (1887), Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891), and Jude the Obscure (1895).