Mazar Tagh

Mazar Tagh

 

a mountain range in the western Kashgar Plain in western China. The range is approximately 150 km long, with elevations reaching 1,635 m; it is composed primarily of sandstones. Deserts with very sparse vegetation predominate.

References in periodicals archive ?
A key aim of the International Dunhuang Project's field trips was to replicate the photographs taken by Stein, in order to document the changes that have taken place over the past century These photographs of the eighth-century Tibetan fort at Mazar Tagh, taken on 16 November 1916 (ABOVE) and from the same angle in November 2008 (BELOW), show how little the structure has deteriorated
Those referred to in those publications as Fragments 12, 15, 16, 23, 27, 30, and 33 belong to the Stein collection and come from Mazar Tagh.
However, a significant Sogdian presence at sites such as Mazar Tagh, Dandan Uiliq, and Old Domoko is clear from references in the Khotanese, Chinese, Tibetan, and Judeo-Persian documents from these sites, (8) as well as from the earlier discoveries of Sogdian documents cited above.
If so, it may be compared with the name of the spata Sijaka, which is attested on a wooden stick from Mazar Tagh.