Mazdakism

(redirected from Mazdak)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Mazdakism

 

a religious and philosophical doctrine that became widespread in Persia and several neighboring countries in the early Middle Ages.

Although it had been in existence since the end of the third century, the doctrine received its name from Mazdak, the leader of the Mazdakite movement of the late fifth and early sixth centuries. The main idea in Mazdakism is that the world exists as a result of the conflict between the principle of light and goodness, which acts in accordance with reason and laws, and the principle of darkness and evil, which takes the form of chaos and accident. The conflict between the two principles will inevitably end, in this world, with the triumph of good over evil.

Mazdakism included ideas about the necessity of mutual help and equality of property; these ideas are also found in a number of other religious sects of Iran and the Roman Empire. Because of its support of the abolition of social inequality, which it identified with evil and, therefore, with the opposite of the good, and for the institution, by force, of “god-given” universal equality, Mazdakism became the ideology of the Mazdakite movement at the end of the fifth century. After the movement was suppressed in the sixth century, communes professing Mazdakism remained in Persia, Middle Asia, and Azerbaijan until the 14th century. The ideas of Mazdakism were used by many popular movements of the medieval East.

References in periodicals archive ?
A man going by the name of Mazdak Jan, bears an uncanny resemblance to Emraan.
Fahmida Riaz's novella Qila-i-Faramoshi, for instance, was a tale woven around Mazdak, the Zoroastrian mobad [cleric or priest] considered one of the earliest socialists in history.
The Persian reformer Mazdak formulated communism over a thousand years before Karl Marx.
Even the Bundahisn, "Book of Primal Creation," which underwent its final major redaction in the year 1078 and does mention Mazdak and his followers (33: 19), has only a vague reference: groh-e ayend suxr nisan ud suxr draf's ud pars ud rostagiha i eran sahr ta o babil girend ud awesan tazlgan nizar kunend, "A group will come [with] red signs and red banners, and they will seize Fars and the provinces of the land of Iran up to Babylon and they will weaken the Arabs" (33: 24).
Mazdak Parsi for providing the experimental data from the University of Tulsa.
Mazdak Faiznia, who is known to have very close relations with Christie's Auction along with Deputy Commissioner Marco Meneguzzo.
So there was a store with a well in front of the square, Mazdak was plunged into the well and took plaster and cast it down there so that it was hardened" (Aufi, 1: 225).
Mazdak and colleagues from Isfahan, Iran where mytomycin C was injected submucosally after DVIU and recurrence rate compared.
But when Mazdak Taghioskoui moved from Iran to Washington, DC, to get his master's and doctorate at George Washington University he found his dream turn into a nightmare.
In Iraq, they are called the Qaramita and Mazdakiyya because just like the Mazdak during the Sassanid era, goods and women put out in the open belonged to everyone; they said that no one could own or save things," Akseki wrote.
The Conference was organised by Peter Childs, a long standing Member of the IED, Anthony Bull, and Mazdak Ghajari, who also edited the proceedings.
Liverpool crown court heard Mazdak Abdi bit a broken window and was writing in blood on the walls of his home after being tortured in Iran.