Masuria

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Masuria

(məzo͝o`rēə), Ger. Masurenland, Pol. Mazury, region, N Poland. It is a low-lying area covered by large lakes and forests and drained by many small rivers. The original population of the region was expelled by the Teutonic Knights and replaced (14th cent.) with Polish settlers. Masuria later became part of East Prussia and was largely Germanized by the early 20th cent. After Masuria passed to Poland in 1945, most of the German-speaking population was expelled and replaced by Poles. The Masurian Lakes region, where more than 2,700 lakes are located, was the scene of heavy fighting early in World War I. Two Russian armies, commanded by generals Samsonov and Rennenkampf, were defeated in the region—Samsonov by Hindenburg at Tannenburg (Aug., 1914) and Rennenkampf by Mackensen in the lake country (Sept., 1914). The Russians were also repulsed (Feb., 1915) in Masuria in the so-called Winter Battle.

Masuria

a region of NE Poland: until 1945 part of East Prussia: includes the Masurian Lakes, scene of Russian defeats by the Germans (1914, 1915) during World War I
References in periodicals archive ?
For Oldenberg and the German clergy, unacceptable practices in 1865 were the residual Catholic and non-Christian observances that still commanded enormous respect in Protestant Mazuria.
The Reformation in Mazuria may have contended with the Christianization of a pagan people, but it was painfully obvious that after three hundred years of preaching and religious instruction, the Protestant perspective had made little impact on the Polish-speaking Mazurians.
63) The Jesuits, for example, who had acquired the chapel of the Holy Linden in 1631, intentionally constructed a magnificent baroque basilica (1687-93) on the site that was close to the border with Mazuria because they wanted to lure Protestants into their splendid sanctuary.
Despite the presence of several Baptist chapels in the districts, Oldenberg only devoted three pages to their activities because he believed that it was a militant Catholicism that threatened Mazuria.
78) Even the German historian of Mazuria, Max Toppen, who read Oldenberg's report in 1869, agreed with Oldenberg's general assessment but felt he was too pessimistic.
Administrators in the new Second Empire abolished the office of Vice-Superintendent for Mazuria, and Konigsberg once again became directly responsible for its Mazurian congregations.
German and Polish Catholic farmers from Ermland were purchasing land in Mazuria.
The semiliterate Mazurians never modified their premodern spirituality and re-entered the bureaucratic spotlight in 1883, when a new report of Catholic farmers purchasing land in Mazuria precipitated another crisis.
Schwetschke, 1861), the unpublished manuscripts of the German authority on Mazuria, Max Toppen (1822-93), and the letters of Martin Gerss (1808-95) with whom Oldenberg corresponded between September 1865 and January 1866.