Mbundu


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Mbundu

(əmbo͞on`do͞o), black African ethnic group, W Angola. The Mbundu speak Bantu languages and number about 6 million. By the late 15th cent. they had formed the Ndongo kingdom, ruled by the ngola (from which the Portuguese derived the name Angola). Beginning in the early 16th cent. Ndongo was raided for slaves by its northern neighbor, the kingdom of the Kongo, which sold them to the Portuguese. In 1579 the Portuguese first attempted to conquer Ndongo; however, the Mbundu resisted fiercely and it was not until 1683 that the kingdom was definitively defeated. In the 1970s the Mbundu were the strongest supporters of the Marxist-oriented movement for the Liberation of Angola.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dessa e de outras formas, diz Miller (1995: 5053), as atividades dos mestres cacadores yibinda reforcavam a integridade dos grupos de filiacao mbundu.
Both books present a wealth of Mbundu fables, songs, and folk sayings.
Ribas' study of Mbundu culture and religion, Ilundo: Divindades e ritos angolanos (1958; "Ilundo: Angolan Divinations and Rites"), appeared after 18 years of research.
Changing Patterns of Power in the Luanda Hinterland: The Impact of European Trade and Colonization on the Mbundu, c.
Mudancas nos padroes de poder do 'hinterland' de Luanda: o impacto da colonizacao sobre os Mbundu (c.
Miller, Kings and Kinsmen: Early Mbundu States in Angola (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1976), 302.
The Impact of Trade and Colonisation on the Mbundu ca.
2) Jill Dias, "Changing Patterns of Power in the Luanda Hinterland: The Impact of Trade and Colonisation on the Mbundu, c.
17) David Birmingham, Trade and Conflict in Angola: The Mbundu and their Neighbours under the Influence of the Portuguese, 1483-1790 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1966); David Birmingham and Richard Gray (eds.
Beginning in 1955-56, the principal efforts of Angolan nationalism bifurcated into two streams: the Luanda stream of largely (but not entirely) Mbundu groups and the Leopoldville-Belgian Congo stream of Kongo exiles from northwestern Angola.
24) Most but by no means all of the drafters and the signatories were Africans of Mbundu descent, at least from the region of Luanda, it not from the city itself, and the leaders were members of small groups such as ELA and MLA, described sometimes collectively as "the Methodists" and "the nurses".