McGuffey Readers

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McGuffey Readers

sold 122,000,000 copies and exerted profound moral and cultural effect in mid 19th-century America. [Am. Hist.: Hart, 509]
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Aside from the odd library folio of Shakespeare or a personal edition of a well-to-do book collector, the McGuffey Reader is the place where nearly every nineteenth-century Iowan, including Garland, first encountered Shakespeare.
Roland McCook, the great-great grandson of Ouray and Chipeta, best expressed the young Ute student's attitude toward the boarding school textbooks, primarily the McGuffey Reader, by saying that the books had "no real meaning" to Ute children (Witherspoon, 1993; McCook, 2006).
The schools would have classes complete with lessons from the McGuffey Reader which Ford recalled from his own childhood.
A facsimile edition of The McGuffey Reader is available through the Smithsonian Institution's bookstores, where it is a best seller
Whether students read the McGuffey Reader, Hilliard's Reader, Barnes' Reader, or the Monroe Reader, they were sure to encounter treatments of these emotions.
The most prominent textbook of the 19th century, the McGuffey Reader, was filled with biblical tales, poems and stories laden with moral lessons.
Anyone who has ever examined a McGuffey Reader knows that moral messages were an integral part of the series.
Grant, Charles Darwin--as well as children's classics such as the fairy tales of Perrault, Grimm, and Andersen, the original Alice in Wonderland, Pinocchio, Uncle Remus, The Wizard of Oz, and all six volumes of the McGuffey Readers.
Williams Holmes McGuffey was the author of the McGuffey Readers that were used as school texts beginning in the 1800's.