McGurk effect


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McGurk effect

[mə′gərk i‚fekt]
(physiology)
An auditory illusion discovered by H. McGurk that demonstrates the important contribution made by visible face movements to normal speech perception.
References in periodicals archive ?
This phenomenon is named the McGurk effect for Scottish cognitive psychologist Harry McGurk.
The researchers pinpointed the source of the McGurk effect by recording and analyzing brain signals in the temporal cortex, the region of the brain that typically processes sound.
This can result in difficulties with auditory processing due to the McGurk effect.
Cross-modal discrepancies in coarticulation and the integration of speech information: the McGurk effect with mismatched vowels.
The new study of children takes advantage of the so-called McGurk effect, a perceptual illusion that pinpoints how visual and auditory information intersect in the brain.
Fox, a developmental psychologist at the University of Maryland at College Park, and his colleagues tested the McGurk effect in 35 children with normal hearing and 36 who were born deaf but had received cochlear implants.
In their conversation, they discussed a phenomenon called the McGurk effect, which is an illusion first reported in 1976.
The McGurk effect is so amazing because it demonstrates clearly that speech is not just what you hear," said Knudsen.
The McGurk Effect is a well-characterized example of the integration between what we see and what we hear when someone is speaking to us.
The McGurk Effect occurs even when participants are aware of the dubbing or told to concentrate only on the audio.
He illustrates this point by reconsidering a strange laboratory finding dubbed the McGurk effect, after its discoverer, developmental psychologist Harry McGurk.
Researchers have typically explained the McGurk effect as a neural compromise.