McLuhan


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McLuhan

(Herbert) Marshall. 1911--80, Canadian author of works analysing the mass media, including Understanding Media (1964) and The Medium is the Message (1967)
References in periodicals archive ?
McLuhan was a quote machine, spinning out snappy phrases that would both capture his ideas and provoke others to wonder what he meant.
Today's Doodle, which celebrates the visionary's 106th birthday, illustrates this theory by showing how McLuhan viewed human history.
O pensamento de Marshall McLuhan pode ser acompanhado na sua obra sobre os meios de comunicacao como representando extensoes do ser humano.
A key part of the book's agenda is to suggest the relevance of McLuhan to contemporary media theory, a project which needed both a more nuanced commentary of the nature of contemporary mobile platforms and, in the case of her chosen location, a more detailed and critical overview of Western interventions into Afghanistan and surrounding regions.
McLuhan chose England because it seemed to be an imagined community far different than that found in Canada.
The main concept that McLuhan wants to show is that the message is no longer as important as the medium itself.
According to McLuhan, means of communication that are perceived as belonging to the past create a "language of the heart" that encourages medium specific types of awareness and cognitive shifts in a viewer.
The term McLuhan uses is sensus communis (literally "common sense" in Latin).
Both Innis and McLuhan are against instrumental look to technology.
McLuhan presents himself at the outset as someone who knows very little about scientific parapsychology, someone who more or less accepts the "debunkings" of Randi and others.
So wrote Canadian communications theorist Marshall McLuhan in his book The Medium is the Massage: An Inventory of Effects, published in 1967.
I take advantage of this shift in emphasis to consider the relevance of Marshall McLuhan in between.