Simla Convention

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Simla Convention

 

an agreement concluded between McMahon, representing Great Britain, and Lonchen Shatra, representing local Tibetan authorities, on July 3, 1914, in the city of Simla, India. A British draft of the convention was discussed at an Anglo-Chinese-Tibetan conference in Simla in 1913 and 1914. In March 1914, during the conference, McMahon and Shatra exchanged secret letters and maps concerning a line demarcating the eastern part of the frontier between Tibet and British India. The line, which came to be known as the McMahon Line, was later entered on the maps appended to the British draft convention.

The Simla Convention obligated the Chinese government not to annex Tibet and not to send Chinese troops or civilians into Tibet. The Chinese representative, under pressure from the British, at first initialed the British draft convention but later never signed it. The Chinese government refused to recognize the Simla Convention.

References in periodicals archive ?
Deng even suggested renaming the contested McMahon Line in the east as a new " India- China line", Yang said.
The latest Sino-India border agreement aimed at mitigating security hazards on the McMahon Line that registered unprecedented understanding and improvement of their bilateral ties bears testimony to the developments that even China, the strategic ally of Pakistan, is no more a bulwark to her expanding economic goals.
While pointing out that the large border between Bhutan, China and Myanmar demarcated by McMahon line," he said it was impossible even for the Army personnel to man the entire inhospitable areas.
This area had historically been claimed by Lhasa, but was ceded by Tibet in the 1913-14 Simla Agreement that saw the drawing of the McMahon Line.
In India, McMahon is chiefly remembered for having drawn the McMahon line in 1913 to keep the peace between India and China.
Lan, who earlier served in the Chinese Embassy in New Delhi and is an expert on India- China relations, said the " illegal McMahon Line.
The 1914 Simla Accord defined the McMahon Line as the new boundary between British India and Tibet.
The British rulers of India had reached agreement on the McMahon line with the leadership of Tibet (which was autonomous at the time) at a conference in Simla in 1914.
Singh was asked about China's strong reaction to India's plans to construct a road network along the McMahon Line from Mago- Thingbu in Tawang to Vijaynagar in Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh to match China's infrastructure development.
On the one hand, China refuses to honour the 1940 Shimla Agreement between the British and Tibetan authorities on McMahon Line, and on the other, it claims 90,000 square kilometers of territory that stretches beyond Arunachal to the northern bank of the Brahmaputra in Assam on the ground that these areas were once taken over by soldiers of the 33rd King of Tibet Songtsen Gompa.
The British and the Tibetan Government thereafter, signed the agreement on 3rd July 1914 delineating the border between India and Tibet which became known as the McMahon line.
The Chinese should accept the McMahon Line and we should accept where they ( Chinese) are on the West with some adjustments, to make the lines more defensible," a former Indian foreign secretary told Mail Today.