Meadow Soils

Meadow Soils

 

soils that form under meadow vegetation.

There are a number of groups of meadow soils, including meadow soils proper, which are found on steppes and semideserts, have a humus horizon of 20-40 cm, and form under the action of groundwater near the surface. Alluvial soils, which have a varying humus horizon, form in river floodplains and deltas. Mountain meadow soils, which have a humus horizon of about 30 cm, form in mountainous regions, usually above the timberline under alpine and subalpine meadow vegetation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Comparative analysis of alas meadow soils of alases Lena-Amga and Lena-Vilyuy River interfluves showed that the most optimal conditions for earthworms functioning develop in meadow soils of alases of Tiung and Tiukyan rivers' interflude.
Soil type, alas M [] m Lim [sigma] M [] t0, 95m V,% Alas humus fen soil 16 [] 2 0-28 9 12-20 56 (alas Siullyakh) Alas meadow boggy 11 [] 2 0-32 9 6-15 86 soil (alas Timofie) Alas meadow-humus 53 [] 5 7-89 22 42-63 41 alkaline soil (alas Muosaany) Alas meadow soil 32 [] 6 0-78 25 20-43 80 (alas Muosaany) Alas gleyey soil 32 [] 3 0-50 15 25-39 46 (alas Angala) Alas meadow gleyey 25 [] 2 10-37 8 21-29 33 soil (alas Angala)
Comparison of carbon contents in meadow soils shows that the total carbon content is higher in the lower point of relief of the plot concerned.
Upon analysing the data of meadow soil a phenomenon identical with arable soil was identified.
The only previous dust and soil data collected (Walker and Costin 1971) suggested that the accession of aeolian dust across the mountainous areas of south-eastern Australia has been a significant factor in the development of alpine soils, in particular, snow patch meadow soils.
Snow patch meadow soils exhibited 47% clay and 22% silt, and alpine humus soils 21% clay and 8% silt, with the clay contents being dominated by kaolin.
Neopaxia australasica alliance) and their associated snow patch meadow soils, and the tall alpine herbfield communities (Celmesia spp.
The snow patch meadow soils also showed a difference, although less distinct, between the surface and sub-surface horizons, where they had considerably higher clay and lower sand content in the sub-surface horizons ([r.
The major exchangeable cations in these soils are Ca and Mg, with the amount of exchangeable Ca in the surface horizons of the snow patch meadow soils being conspicuously high.
The clay mineralogy of the dust samples (Table 4) was remarkably similar to those of the surface horizons of the soils, and in particularly the snow patch meadow soils, with illite and kaolinite dominating.
The snow patch meadow soils, however, had lower clay but higher silt percentages in the sub-surface horizons than the surface horizons.