Meadow Soils

Meadow Soils

 

soils that form under meadow vegetation.

There are a number of groups of meadow soils, including meadow soils proper, which are found on steppes and semideserts, have a humus horizon of 20-40 cm, and form under the action of groundwater near the surface. Alluvial soils, which have a varying humus horizon, form in river floodplains and deltas. Mountain meadow soils, which have a humus horizon of about 30 cm, form in mountainous regions, usually above the timberline under alpine and subalpine meadow vegetation.

References in periodicals archive ?
It consists of alpine meadow grassland types with grassy weeds as vegetation and meadow soils.
Comparative analysis of alas meadow soils of alases Lena-Amga and Lena-Vilyuy River interfluves showed that the most optimal conditions for earthworms functioning develop in meadow soils of alases of Tiung and Tiukyan rivers' interflude.
Soil type, alas M [] m Lim [sigma] M [] t0, 95m V,% Alas humus fen soil 16 [] 2 0-28 9 12-20 56 (alas Siullyakh) Alas meadow boggy 11 [] 2 0-32 9 6-15 86 soil (alas Timofie) Alas meadow-humus 53 [] 5 7-89 22 42-63 41 alkaline soil (alas Muosaany) Alas meadow soil 32 [] 6 0-78 25 20-43 80 (alas Muosaany) Alas gleyey soil 32 [] 3 0-50 15 25-39 46 (alas Angala) Alas meadow gleyey 25 [] 2 10-37 8 21-29 33 soil (alas Angala)
Comparison of carbon contents in meadow soils shows that the total carbon content is higher in the lower point of relief of the plot concerned.
Assuming that montane meadows are less productive than lowland prairies and grasslands, our results suggest that mound soils, originating from deeper horizons, are less fertile than adjacent meadow soils, consistent with a pattern of lower root productivity and soil organic matter at depth (e.
Northern chrenozems mixed with meadow soils and small areas of saline soils cover about 1 million ha (2.
The only previous dust and soil data collected (Walker and Costin 1971) suggested that the accession of aeolian dust across the mountainous areas of south-eastern Australia has been a significant factor in the development of alpine soils, in particular, snow patch meadow soils.
and amino acids in the alpine dry meadow soils reflect an important role for the soil in adsorbing and retaining nitrogen compounds.
Dry and moist meadow soils are primarily Cryumbrepts, while wet meadow soils have been classified as Cryaquepts (Burns 1980).
0] to total P ranged from 33% in anaerobic bog soils to [less than] 1% in the aerobic swamp and beaver meadow soils.
1994) reported that dry meadow soils of alpine tundra contain substantial carbon concentrations, perhaps the highest of any aerobic soils found in temperate zones.