Mechanical Turk


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

Mechanical Turk

A subsidiary of Amazon.com that provides a Web services system that uses people to perform tasks better handled by humans than computers. Mechanical Turk is a "crowdsourcing" system, in which requesters post Human Intelligence Tasks (HITs) along with the fee they will pay for their completion. Turkers (the workers) choose their HITs, do the jobs and submit the results. Examples of HITs are locating information on a document, translating foreign languages, transcribing speech, as well as comparing audio to written transcripts. For more information, visit www.mturk.com. See crowdsourcing.

Who's the Turk?
The name comes from Wolfgang von Kempelen's mechanical "Turk" in the mid-1700s, which was an expert chess player dressed up as a wooden mannequin. Defeating challengers throughout Europe, including Napoleon, the Turk sat inside a wooden cabinet wearing a robe and turban. Opening the door to reveal gears and springs inside, Kempelen fooled people into believing this was a mechanical device with artificial intelligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conducting behavioral research on Amazon's Mechanical Turk.
Once participants indicated consent, they answered the survey questions, after which they returned to Mechanical Turk and indicated that they completed the task.
As we saw with Goldcorp and Mechanical Turk, given the right circumstances, companies can accomplish more by opening their work to the masses than relying only on company workers.
Anyone can sign up to be a Mechanical Turk worker (get started at www.
Nownow uses Mechanical Turk to find people willing (and capable) of supplying answers to questions.
Amazon's web services evangelist, Jeff Barr, focusing on building software with human intelligence, and what Amazon Mechanical Turk can do for you and your customers.
Leveraging Amazon Mechanical Turk as a key architectural component, Alegion's self-service workflow designer allows large businesses to integrate crowd labor tasks into their complex business processes.
Audiokite Research utilizes Amazon Mechanical Turk, a popular crowdsourcing platform, to attract thousands of reviewers in the United States.
The study is based on a series of experiments the researchers conducted, using the Amazon Mechanical Turk survey system, in which subjects were presented with a series of sentences - some evidently sensible, and others less so - and asked to judge what those sentences meant.

Full browser ?