Medieval Latin


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Medieval Latin

the Latin language as used throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. It had many local forms incorporating Latinized words from other languages
References in periodicals archive ?
Her selection is not representative of medieval Latin poetry; indeed, its secular orientation overlooks the most characteristic form, the hymn.
To summarize, Maloney has presented the scholarly world with a very good translation and with a very careful and lucid introduction with notes and appendices of what is now acknowledged as one of the central texts of medieval Latin semiotics.
A WARWICKSHIRE woman whose book on medieval Latin became the ultimate reference book for historians and archaeologists has died, aged 91.
Then, some fifteen hundred years later, the medieval philosophers prefaced this word with Latin quinta, 'fifth,' an ordinal number equivalent to Greek pempte, establishing the Medieval Latin phrase quinta essentia; and these two words eventually coalesced and passed into English as quintessence.
The word campion entered English from Medieval Latin but it had already been borrowed earlier by Anglo-Saxon where it turned up as cempa or fighter.
Although the name "Angelus" does have a Medieval Latin pedigree, Ward says that in this instance, the Angelus' tale comes from sailors folklore.
Let us hope that the collaboration of Keiji Yamamoto and Charles Burnett, which, along with the further collaboration of Michio Yano, has also brought us the edition of Abu Ma'sar's The Abbreviation of the Introduction to Astrology, together with the Medieval Latin translation of Adelard of Bath (Leiden, 1994), will continue in the future.
He retired in September after celebrating his 40th anniversary in education but continues to lecture in medieval Latin at the university one day a week.
Three chapters do look closely at the Rose: `Lifting the veil', which argues strongly for reading Jean de Meun's text as one that eschews integumenta and defies allegorical readings in the proper sense of that term by equating it with Classical Latin satires, `Parler proprement', which centres on the discussion between Raison and Amant as to whether courtly ladies should use `rude' words like couilles, and `Signe d'estre malles', which discusses at length the relationship of the ending of the Rose in the thinly disguised copulation of the Rose and a pilgrim's staff to medieval Latin comedy and clerical humour reflecting and exorcizing fears that learning leads to impotence.
As the first scholarly edition of a late medieval Latin necromantic work (the Picatrix is Arabic in origin), this makes a valuable contribution to the field especially since the only alternative to examining manuscripts first-hand has been either post-sixteenth century printed works or the dubious translations of modern occultists.
No longer attending or listening to a medieval Latin Mass mumbled by a distant priest with his back to them, Catholics suddenly found their voices and place as participants, and even celebrants, at a Eucharist where they now prayed, sang, read, and eventually took Communion into their own hands.
The prose accents of the Latin conductus texts, in common with those of medieval Latin and vernacular song in general, often seem to be perversely treated when set to music.