Medieval Latin


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Medieval Latin

the Latin language as used throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. It had many local forms incorporating Latinized words from other languages
References in periodicals archive ?
By far the strongest humanist criticism against medieval Latin was the supposed corruption of the pure, classical language with Cicero as its chief model, although this limitation of good and elegant Latin was soon opposed, for instance, by Politianus and Erasmus, and culminating with Justus Lipsius at the end of the sixteenth century.
The last third of the volume consists of a number of valuable medieval Latin texts, together with their German translation in the parallel columns.
cadence Medieval Latin cadentia,literally, falling motion
The amount of Medieval Latin which has actually been edited is small in relation to the amount which still languishes in manuscript.
A new edition of Waddell's Medieval Latin Lyrics will be welcomed by students and scholars alike.
Nevertheless, Kivisto has written an interesting book on the remarkable use of corrupted and monstrous medieval Latin by satirical humanists.
The clausula is especially important in ancient and medieval Latin prose rhythm; most of the clausulae in Cicero's speeches, for example, follow a specific pattern and distinctly avoid certain types of rhythmic endings.
This second volume offers critical editions of all three surviving Hebrew translations and two medieval Latin translations, all from the 13th or 14th century.
Rivero Garcia, and others, whose findings help us put the "classicism" of some humanistic authors in historical context, and to understand the continuing vitality of medieval Latin vocabulary and usages into the period of "Neo-Latin.
In medieval Latin works, the word explicit meant "here ends .
They consider such contexts and influences as patristic and early medieval Latin sources, continental homilaries and preaching practices, traditions of Old Testament interpretation and adaptation, and the liturgical setting of preaching texts.
724, "Canes qui plurimum larrant, perraro mordent" (Barking dogs don't bite), may well be of vernacular provenance as well: it is not found in this form in ancient authors nor is it in Walther's dictionary of medieval Latin proverbs.