Chivalric Romance

(redirected from Medieval romance)

Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in periodicals archive ?
Readers of medieval romance, Lewis asserted, "should deeply study the ferlies as things (in a sense) in the real world," a clause Green italicizes.
Catharines, Ontario) and Adriana Spahr (Associate Professor at the Department of Humanities at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta) the contributors to "Virgin Envy: The Cultural (In)Significance of the Hymen" cover everything from medieval romance, to Bollywood films, to Twilight and True Blood, to destabilize the many assumptions about sexual purity.
St Cuthbert's tower, at the bottom of this page, looks as if it had come straight from a Medieval romance, so no wonder Caergwrle Spa was a popular resort 100 years ago
Ridicule of the medieval romance happened even in the Middle Ages, as we see when the Host intervenes to stop the wearying absurdity of The Tale of Sir Thopas, with slight unkindness to the pilgrim Chaucer.
She also does straight, M/M, and a touch of medieval romance under her other pen name, Rizzo Rosko.
Young readers in love with medieval romance will be thrilled that the enterprising team at Pushkin Children's Books has brought this prize-winning Dutch novel to the UK at last.
The other is shrouded in mist, and "focuses on Druids, stone circles, medieval romance, Celtic languages and literatures, Celtic music, Celtic sources for Arthurian materials, and the like" (3).
On the other hand, firmly rooted in literary texts which provide for a good basis for comparative analysis, Fairies in Medieval Romance manages to offer the reader important and original insights into some of the best-known medieval tales of the supernatural.
Gallagher (French studies, Wheaton College) presents a new translation of the medieval romance story of Tristan and Iseut as recorded by 19th-century French medievalist, Joseph Bedier.
The Bodleian provides the obvious home for such an exhibition, as it houses one of the strongest collections of romance manuscripts and early prints, and its coordination with the Ashmolean and Victoria and Albert museums facilitated the display of a range of non-textual romance artifacts, like jewelry, caskets, and paintings depicting scenes from medieval romance.
While the addition of the courtly love episode has long been recognized as an essential difference between Virgil's story and the medieval romance, a Lacanian reading enables a fresh response to Eneas in love, as the story anticipates treatments of love in subsequent medieval romances, including the seminal work of Chretien de Troyes.
Medieval Romance, Medieval Contexts, edited by Rhiannon Purdie and Michael Cichon.