Chivalric Romance

(redirected from Medieval romance)

Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in periodicals archive ?
Under this name he is "in medieval romance terms the 'fair unknown' [though of course he looks foul and feels fair, as he admits in Bree] who steps from the shadows into the limelight when his moment comes" (Flieger 143).
She also does straight, M/M, and a touch of medieval romance under her other pen name, Rizzo Rosko.
The other is shrouded in mist, and "focuses on Druids, stone circles, medieval romance, Celtic languages and literatures, Celtic music, Celtic sources for Arthurian materials, and the like" (3).
6) For a discussion of Gamelyn's status as a hero as defined by his social status, see Nancy Mason Bradbury's "Gamelyn" in Neil Cartlige's Heroes and Anti-heroes in Medieval Romance (2012), pp.
Gallagher (French studies, Wheaton College) presents a new translation of the medieval romance story of Tristan and Iseut as recorded by 19th-century French medievalist, Joseph Bedier.
While the addition of the courtly love episode has long been recognized as an essential difference between Virgil's story and the medieval romance, a Lacanian reading enables a fresh response to Eneas in love, as the story anticipates treatments of love in subsequent medieval romances, including the seminal work of Chretien de Troyes.
Medieval Romance, Medieval Contexts, edited by Rhiannon Purdie and Michael Cichon.
One of the most significant contributions to our understanding and appreciation of medieval romance in the last two decades has been the focus on the process of rewriting as fundamental to poetic composition.
Part of the "Studies in Medieval Romance" series, Women's Power in Late Medieval Romance is a scholarly examination of the cultural and social power of women in the Middle Ages through their portrayals in literature of the era.
In this conventional reading, critics have conceived the rival powers in terms of a "sheer antithesis between religious and naturalistic worldviews, or medieval romance and modern realism" (16-17).
Compiled in the late fourteenth or early fifteenth century, the manuscript consists of a Castilian Flos sanctorum or compilation of saints' legends combined with the related lives of exemplary characters from medieval romance.
The last chapter, "Coda," subtitled "The Reception of a Genre," sums up the main points of the preceding chapters and further develops her earlier argument about the readership of medieval romance in England.