Chivalric Romance

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Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in periodicals archive ?
As Flieger points out, in the story of Sigmund and other medieval romances, "[t]he fates of sword and man are linked, and the destruction of one signals the end of the other" (147).
Colleagues and former students mark the retirement of Italian literature scholar Kleinhenz with 28 essays on medieval romances between France and Italy, interpretations and reception of Dante's minor works, interpretations and reception of Dante's Commedia, the Italian Middle Ages of the 13th and 14th centuries, the Italian Renaissance of the 15th and 16th centuries, and Renaissance Petrarchism and petrarchiste.
While the addition of the courtly love episode has long been recognized as an essential difference between Virgil's story and the medieval romance, a Lacanian reading enables a fresh response to Eneas in love, as the story anticipates treatments of love in subsequent medieval romances, including the seminal work of Chretien de Troyes.
In the absence of a definition, the author initially tries to derive it from the medieval romances, but does not pursue the issue.
The final chapter involves a change of source material and approach, as Neal moves from the court cases to late medieval romances, and uses psychological insights to explore the conscious and unconscious assumptions of the authors of these poems.
In this engaging and important study, Melissa Furrow offers a rewarding and provocative foray into the world of medieval romances in England.
The chivalric medieval romances were a fictional response to the failure of the crusades, taking imaginative possession of the border between Christendom and Islam, and representing the Saracen, the Turk, and the Moor as figures of this encounter--often assimilating them and their difference inside the Christian cultural space.
offers readers a broader choice of historical periods and locations -- from hot medieval romances to exciting World War II encounters, from sexy Viking adventures to steamy Old West showdowns and, of course, the ever-popular Regency tales.
The appreciation of this new tapestry requires significant feats of memory on the part of the reader, as does the appreciation of medieval romances with their exhaustive lists of characters, long digressions, and complex movements through time as well as space.
Fuchs reiterates how the new romances of the Renaissance continue to dialogue with both classical and medieval romances.
Attention is nicely balanced between details and the larger contexts, both within and beyond the Filocolo--Morosini refers frequently to the French medieval romances which form the literary tradition that Boccaccio seeks to complete and perfect.
The fact that it is a woman who makes the prophecy is especially telling, in view of the magical position assigned to women in medieval romances.