megabyte

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megabyte

[′meg·ə‚bīt]
(computer science)
A unit of information content equal to 1,048,576 (1024 × 1024) bytes. Abbreviated Mbyte. Symbolized M.

megabyte

(unit)
(MB, colloquially "meg") 2^20 = 1,048,576 bytes = 1024 kilobytes. 1024 megabytes are one gigabyte.

The text of a six hundred page paperback book would require about a megabyte of ASCII storage.

See prefix.

megabyte

One million bytes, or more precisely 1,048,576 bytes. Also MB, Mbyte and M-byte. See mega, space/time and never say.
References in periodicals archive ?
9 megabytes of hard disk space, 640 kilobytes of memory and a DOS of 2.
Cartridges cost less than US $100 per 10 megabytes.
The current speed projection for MRAM is about six times faster than today's DRAM memories with initial chip capacity projected to be 1 megabyte.
Some of the applications suites lurking about the marketplace can take 200 to 300 megabytes alone.
The external IBM-based unit uses quarter-inch cartridge (QIC) tapes and can store up to 800 megabytes of data.
Hardware: MacIIxi design workstation with 8 megabytes of RAM, 100-300 megabyte internal hard drive, laser printer, full-color, high-resolution, refrigerator-sized double-page display monitor, accelerator board, network hardware including a file server to link your department with other workstations and client groups, cd-room drive, mass magnetic media storage system, 9600 baud modem, color scanner, color printer and maybe even a super high resolution output device such as a Linotronic L-300.
Video cards: Although most computer makers who sell their goods at retail put only one megabyte of video RAM in the system, add another if you can afford it.
That means getting a Pentium processor of 100 megahertz or better, at least a 1 gigabyte hard drive and 16 megabytes of RAM.
PC requirements: 100-megahertz processor, Windows 95/98/NT, 8 megabytes RAM, 20 megabytes hard-disk space, 2[yen] CD-ROM drive, and 8-bit display.
44 megabytes, about the size of a best-selling novel.
M-Systems (Nasdaq: FLSH), an industry leader and innovator of flash-based data storage devices, is announcing the availability of an 8 gigabyte DiskOnKey USB flash drive (UFD), celebrating five years of personal, portable and pocketable USB storage with 1000X the density of its original 8 megabytes DiskOnKey first launched in 2000.