Megasphaera

Megasphaera

[mə′gas·fə·rə]
(microbiology)
A genus of bacteria in the family Veillonellaceae; relatively large cells occurring in pairs arranged in chains.
References in periodicals archive ?
Megasphaera, Leptotrichia were found less frequent in 0-3 Nugent scores, but Leptotrichia detection in both pH groups did not differ statistically.
oxytoca Yes (95) No Lyngbya (a) Yes (45) No Megasphaera (a) Yes (20) No Microcystis (a) Yes (10) No Novosphingobium N.
In addition, the company is waiting for the approval of Megasphaera elsdenii by the US Food and Drug Administration, for which it registered eighteen months ago.
One bacterium in particular, Megasphaera elsdenii, showed extremely high levels of resistance to chlortetracycline, an antibiotic used to treat a variety of infections," says Stanton.
Using the GeneDisc plate for beer-spoilage bacteria, the system simultaneously screens for the presence or absence of 20 critical beer-spoilage bacteria, including the relevant species of Lactobacillus, Megasphaera, Pediococcus and Pectinatus sp.
In addition, although previous studies revealed that the addition of acarbose produces a lower Streptococcus bovis to Megasphaera elsdenii ratio than in the rumen of the control group (Blanch et al.
Moreover, this was probably due to some effects of the yeast contained in YEFECAP that stimulated the growth and metabolism of rumen microorganisms especially lactate-utilizing bacteria, such as Megasphaera elsdenii or Selenomonas ruminantium (Lynch and Martin, 2002).
PCR primers for the following taxa have been described previously (Stevenson and Weimer, 2007): Butyrivibrio fibrisolven, Prevotella ruminicola, Megasphaera elsdenii, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Streptococcus bovis.
Lactic acid-utilizing bacteria such as Megasphaera elsdenii, and Selenomonas ruminantium play a central role in preventing the accumulation of ruminal lactic acid in grain-adapted cattle (Counotte et al.
Other distinctive bacterial species such as Megasphaera elsdenii and Prevotella bryantii have also been used as DFM to stabilize or improve rumen function.
These data suggest that reduction of methane by monensin feeding is not due to a reduction in the population size of methanogens but is more likely due to the development of an alternative hydrogen-consuming pathway such as propionate enhancement by stimulation of the proliferation of propionate- and succinate-producing bacteria such as Selenomonas and Megasphaera (Russell and Strobel, 1989).
Furthermore, following concentrate feeding it has also been demonstrated that a concomitant rise in Megasphaera elsdenii occurs within the rumen (Counotte etal.