Mehetabel

Mehetabel

(mēhĕt`əbĕl), in the Bible, wife of Hadad, king of Edom.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Although censure is not the only conceivable explanation for anonymity, it makes sense also with Potiphar's wife in Genesis 39 and contrasts with many major and minor female characters who are named in Genesis: Eve (Genesis 1-4), Adah wife of Lamech (4:19-23), Zillah (4:19-23), Namah (4:19-23), Milcah (11:29, 22:20-23, 24:15-47), Sarai/Sarah (17-18, 20-21, 23-25, 49), Hagar (16, 21, 25), Rebekah (24-29, 35, 49), Keturah (25), Judith (26:34), Basemath (26:34, 36:3-17), Mahalath (28:9), Rachel (29-31, 33, 35, 46, 48), Leah (29-31, 33-35, 46, 49), Bilhah (29-30, 35, 37, 46), Zilpah (29-30, 35, 37, 46), Dinah (30, 34, 46), Adah wife of Esau (36:6-16), Oholibamah (36:2-41), Timnah (38:12-14), Mehetabel (36:39), Tamar (14, 38), and Asenath (41, 46).
Curled up on the lower of two bunk beds was a mottled brown and white angora cat named Mehetabel, an animal of undetermined age whom the Schindlers had rescued as a stray several years before at Cape Cod.
Bobby crawled onto the bunk and hoisted Mehetabel onto his stomach.
They're gonna put us in reform school this time," Bobby whimpered, clutching the purring Mehetabel.
By and by, Mehetabel the cat ventured out onto the patio and reclined languorously in a little puddle of sunlight.
The phlegmatic Mehetabel cooperated like a flight cadet as they fitted her harness with its thrilling new accessory and carried her back out to the terrace.
Mehetabel felt practically weightless as Bobby held her over the rail.
Like the gliders before, Mehetabel hung eerily suspended a moment on an updraft.
But just as Jeff cleared a potted hydrangea, Mehetabel sailed over his head and out of reach.
Moments later, the two stood together on the planter at the wall, watching goggle-eyed as Mehetabel sailed westward across Fifth Avenue toward the immensity of Central Park, her legs now merely dangling, and her cries of "meow" gleeping across the ether like the yelps of an astounded voyager aloft in a strange and wondrous land.
Bodanza pointed out the headstone of Mehetabel Estabrook, the wife of Nathaniel Estabrook, whose family, originally from Lexington, bought the Kendall Tavern on West Street, another famous Leominster landmark that is rumored to have been part of the Underground Railroad.
A bibliographical survey of the published works of the eighteenth-century Wesleys (Samuel the Elder, Samuel the Younger, Mehetabel, John, and Charles).