Mehmed II


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Mehmed II

 

known as Fatih (“the conqueror”). Born Mar. 30, 1432, in Edirne (Adrianople); died Apr. 3 (or May 3), 1481, in Hunkârçiri. Turkish sultan (reigned 1444; 1451–81).

Mehmed II conducted a policy of conquest and personally headed the campaigns of the Turkish Army. In 1453 he conquered Constantinople and made it the capital of the Ottoman Empire, thereby putting an end to Byzantium. Mehmed’s reign also saw the annexation of Serbia (1459), the conquest of Morea (1460), the Trabzon (Trebizond) Empire (1461), Bosnia (1463), and the island of Euboea (1471), the completion of the conquest of Albania (1479), and the subjugation of the Crimean Khanate (1475). The first law code of the Ottoman Empire was compiled under Mehmed II.

References in periodicals archive ?
Soon after conquering Bosnia, however, Mehmed II gave way to the insistence of the local converts to Islam, that their children should be admitted to the Janissary corps.
Edited and translated by Marios Philippides (professor of Classics, University of Massachusetts), Mehmed II The Conqueror And the Fall of the Franco-Byzantine Levant to the Ottoman Turks: Some Western Views and Testimonies is a collection of primary historical sources concerning the fall of Constantinople and the subsequent Ottoman advance in the Aegean from 1453 to 1481.
Another intriguing meeting of East and West is the Venetian portrait of the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, the highlight of Sotheby's sale Arts of the Islamic World in London on 24 October (estimate 200,000 [pounds sterling]-300,000 [pounds sterling]).
When Constantinople fell to Mehmed II in 1453, more than a century before Lepanto, the Turks believed themselves to be on the road to universal dominion.
Two imperial palaces (the Old and New), Yedikule Fortress for the Treasury, the Grand Covered Bazaar, the large religious complex founded by Mehmed II and other kulliyes of viziers and finally the neighborhood settlements around the charity buildings facilitated the repopulation of the city.
Sultan Mehmed II (reigned 1451-80), one of the most successful military leaders in the Empire's history, not only captured Constantinople, but extensively expanded Ottoman domains in Europe and Asia.
The exhibition also makes a reference to the space in which it's being hosted: The Tophane-i Amire was designed and built as a cannon foundry and armory by the architect Sinan, commissioned by Sultan Mehmed II the Conqueror.
The marketplace, which was constructed upon an order by Sultan Mehmed II the Conqueror in 1461, will celebrate its 550th birthday with a series of cultural events.
How little, ancient Byzantion became Constantine's capital, how next that capital engendered the great Byzantine Christian culture up to the conquest of Mehmed II, who then turned it into a cosmopolitan centre where Orthodox Greeks of Phanarion coexisted alongside their new Ottoman rulers and the Armenians--all of this is the subject of an exhibition that is first and foremost a narrative of complex and entrenched history.
Key to understanding the exhibition is a striking section devoted to Mehmed II, who conquered Constantinople in 1453 at age 21 and ended Byzantine rule.
The Sultan Mehmed II had boasted to Pope Sixtus IV that he would "allow his horse to eat his oats on the Tomb of St.
The exhibition was organized jointly by the Gardner Museum in Boston and the National Gallery in London, presumably because of a desire to exhibit together the Gardner's Seated Soribe and the National Gallery's Portrait of Mehmed II, both convincingly attributed to Gentile.