Muhammad IV

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Muhammad IV

or

Mehmet IV,

1641–92, Ottoman sultan (1648–87). He was proclaimed sultan of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey) by the corps of JanissariesJanissaries
[Turk.,=recruits], elite corps in the service of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey). It was composed of war captives and Christian youths pressed into service; all the recruits were converted to Islam and trained under the strictest discipline.
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 after the deposition and murder of his father, Sultan Ibrahim. Disorder and corruption continued until the KöprülüKöprülü
, family of humble Albanian origin, several members of which served as grand vizier (chief executive officer) in the Ottoman Empire. The name is also spelled Kiuprili, Koprili, and Kuprili.
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 family obtained (1656) the office of grand vizier (chief executive officer) and restored order. However, the empire suffered severe setbacks. Algiers freed itself (1669) from Ottoman suzerainty. In 1683 the Turks, in alliance with the Hungarian ThökölyThököly, Imre
, 1656–1705, Hungarian rebel, of a noble family of N Hungary. His father, Stephen Thököly, took an important part in the unsuccessful conspiracy of Francis I Rákóczy and Peter Zrinyi against Holy Roman Emperor Leopold I and
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, besieged Vienna but were repulsed by King John III of Poland. Turkish weakness being apparent, a Holy League was formed to carry the war into Ottoman territory. After the Turkish defeat (1687) at Mohacs by Charles V of Lorraine, Muhammad was deposed. His brother, Sulayman II, succeeded him.
References in periodicals archive ?
All the more remarkable, then, that we have Baer's book put front and center the drama of Ottoman politics, organized around the career of Mehmed IV (r.
The first chapter, entitled "Inauspicious Enthronement," describes in vivid terms the tumultuous accession of Mehmed IV, and the second chapter, entitled "A Decade of Crisis," narrates the first decade of Mehmed's rule, during which the empire was confronted with a set of interrelated challenges: the recurring and violent power struggles between palace factions, growing financial deficits, a continuing pattern of rebellion in the provinces, and a prolonged and debilitating war with Venice.
Entitled "Conversion to Piety," chapter five explores the ways in which Kadizadeli preacher Vani Mehmed Efendi persuaded Mehmed IV to adopt a more "rational" and assertive form of religious moralism, both in personal piety and in public actions.
Joined with this argument is Baer's revisionist claim that Mehmed IV, rather than being a passive and distant ruler absorbed in the frivolous pursuit of hunting as depicted in conventional scholarship, was, in fact, an engaged and conscientious sultan who still "mattered" in the domain of political affairs.
Also from Madinah is a incense burner given by Murad IV's mother, Kosem Sultan, the most powerful woman in Ottoman history who during Murad's reign, that of his brother Ibrahim I and finally of her grandson Mehmed IV exercised vast power before finally being murdered by Mehmed's mother in 1651.
The four essays on Quaker women explore the "injurious speech" of Mary Howgill, Elizabeth Stirredge, and Elizabeth Hooton leveled directly at and in the presence of alternately Oliver Cromwell and Charles II; Mary Fisher's meeting in 1658 with Sultan Mehmed IV, the ruler of the Ottoman Empire; anti-tithe petitions; and the strategies women employed to "deal with the dual demands of serving God and the family" (19, 100).
4) In the midst of this continuing fiscal and moral crisis, Sultan Mehmed IV (1648-87) conferred authority on a family of reforming grand viziers, or chief ministers-the Koprulu family, who headed the Ottoman government for most of the second half of the seventeenth century.